Selena Gomez Just Revealed Her Skin-Care Routine

Selena Gomez, beauty entrepreneur. That’s the latest title the multitalented actor/singer/producer has added to her resumé with the launch of her beauty line, Rare Beauty

To mark the big debut, Gomez filmed a video for Vogue in which she shares her skin-care and day-to-night beauty routines—including how she gets that perfect cat-eye. “I think when I was younger, I didn’t really take care of my skin because I didn’t really know why. I was working since I was seven and had makeup on, and figuring all that out,” she says in the video. “I would say I didn’t care until the last few years when I realized how important it was.” 

She continued, “I’ve for sure had acne, and usually it’s all in the T-zone. I try not to pick at anything, but sometimes that’s hard.” She also talks about why skin care is so important to her now: “When you’re taking care of your skin, you’re taking care of your body, your mind, and your soul.”

Of course, Gomez used a number of her new Rare Beauty products, but she’s also a fan of some of our favorites, like Tatcha Dewy Skin Moisturizer and Drunk Elephant Umbra Sheer Sunscreen SPF 30. “I have lupus, so being in the sun is kind of difficult for me. I like to put my sunscreen on,” she says. 

Drunk Elephant Umbra Sheer Physical Daily Defense Sunscreen SPF 30

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Gomez also shared some makeup tips using products from Rare Beauty (like the liquid blush), plus a Marc Jacobs Beauty eye shadow palette, and Benefit’s famous Hoola Matte Bronzer. “I think growing up, I felt like makeup was a part of my world,” she said. “Being in different facets of the industry, it’s been really fun to play with it. It makes a character when you’re on set … with music, you can create stories with it. For fashion, there are so many different ways that makeup is expressed, even beyond what they’re wearing.”

Rare Beauty Soft Pinch Liquid Blush

Sephora

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Marc Jacobs Beauty Eye-Conic Multi-Finish Eyeshadow Palette

Marc Jacobs

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Benefit Hoola Matte Bronzer

Benefit

$30

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Watch the full Selena Gomez skin-care  routine, below. 

The 5 Products Glamour Editor Khaliha Hawkins Swears By on Wash Day

For as long as I can remember, wash day in my house has consisted of going to my local Dominican hair salon and gossiping with my hairstylist, Kathy, who I’ve known since I was a little girl. She’s tried to convince me out of some crazy haircuts, colors, and styles in the past—even though she regrettably failed to persuade me out of one extremely poor middle school dance look. Those pictures no longer exist.

I’ve had relaxed hair since I was a kid—and well before the recommended age a child should even get relaxer. By the time I started going to Kathy, I was used to sitting in the salon chair and waiting for the cream to sting.

So when New York City went into lockdown in March, the idea of having to wash my own hair was daunting. At first, I focused on replicating Kathy’s techniques and results, which was easier than expected, but I missed the salon’s camaraderie. I also missed not thinking about my hair and the journey it’s been through.

My main thought was my hair would be a challenge, and when it wasn’t, I was left wondering what could have been. I started spending hours in the shower trying new routines and mixtures to detangle and strengthen my hair, and I tested how much product was enough to condition it to perfection. (I’ve now learned you can never have too much.) I’ve always loved showers, blasting music, seeing the mirrors steam up, and my fingertips get pruney, but during quarantine, showers became my time to treat myself and decompress. I found my favorite body trio set (The 529 Trio by Redoux), a great playlist (Feelin’ Myself on Spotify), and a moment to breathe and reflect.

As lockdown restrictions eased, I was recently able to get my hair braided, and honestly, I don’t think I’m going back to relaxed hair. Braids have drastically shortened my morning routine and allowed me to think about what I want my hair—and myself—to look like. I don’t really remember my natural hair texture. All I know is that it was too difficult for my parents to manage during their morning routine with two young children. I’ve carried that knowledge and fear about my hair for a while, but quarantine and knotless braids have given me some time to confront it head-on. 

I’m already plotting my next style: It’s between braids and twists. 

Shampoo

I’ve tried making my own shampoo with apple cider vinegar before, but I got the measurements wrong, and I walked around smelling like ACV for days. It was a dark time. So this time I went straight to the store and searched for products that listed it as the main ingredient. Shea Moisture’s Jamaican Black Castor Oil Strengthen & Restore Shampoo works well to purify my scalp without making it feel sensitive afterward. I can also use this after I take my braids out since it’s great for chemically processed hair too.

SheaMoisture Jamaican Black Castor Oil Strengthen & Restore Shampoo

SheaMoisture

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Deep Conditioning

Pantene’s Gold Series Moisture Boost Conditioner worked well before I braided my hair, and I’m a true believer that if it’s not broke don’t fix it. After I’ve thoroughly rinsed my hair and squeeze the excess water out with a towel. I follow-up with the Shea Moisture Jamaican Black Castor Oil Strengthen & Restore Loc and Braid Butter to moisturize my scalp and roots, but not enough to make my braids slip. Finally, I sit under a hooded dryer and decompress. I’ve been slowly reading Brit Bennett’s The Vanishing Half, and I don’t want it to end.

Pantene Pro-V Gold Series Moisture Boost Conditioner

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SheaMoisture Jamaican Black Castor Oil Strengthen & Restore Loc & Braid Butter

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Styling

I’m very particular about the gel I use in my edges and Afro Sheen’s Slick Back Cream Styler is the only cream that doesn’t flake on me. It’s also great to use when I want to have swoops and curls or just slick them straight down. I use my fingers when I can hear my Slack messages going off, but when I have some time to myself I bust out the Baby Tress Edge Styler. I found them through Chillhouse and just ordered two more so my sister can stop taking mine.

Afro Sheen Slick Back Cream Styler

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Baby Tress Edge Styler

Baby Tress

$15

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Khaliha Hawkins is a producer at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @khalihaina.

Away on Netflix: What Is It Like to Literally Parent From Space?

Hilary: Karen, if you wouldn’t mind sharing the story you told me…You don’t have to, but I find it really fascinating. 

Karen: Yeah, I don’t mind sharing it because there was a lot of emotion with it. After my first space shuttle flight, in 2008, I was really eager to go again. Extremely eager. But Doug and I were trying to have a child when I was assigned to the spacial mission STS-132. I was assigned to the flight and going to do spacewalks…and then I got pregnant. The frustrating part was that my baby was due well before the mission. I had gone to my commander, and we thought I could continue training, have the baby, and then do this mission. We had a plan—we had a backup in case something happened, and I couldn’t continue training. 

And then, I was taken off the flight. It was disappointing. But, like most things, it all worked out fine in the end. Peggy Whitson was the chief of the astronaut office at the time, and as soon as I came off maternity leave she assigned me to a long-duration mission. She took care of me.

Hilary: Didn’t they call it a health crisis or something?

Karen: The official word that went out from NASA was that I was removed from the flight for a temporary medical condition. My son wasn’t quite so temporary. [Laughs]

Glamour: One thing that struck me was watching Emma, a mother, trying to parent from space. Karen, you can actually speak to that unique experience.

Karen: I had to travel a lot for training. It was hard, but I had to learn to give up control. Doug was training when we first had my son Jack—for the first 18 months he was training for a space flight, so he was very busy. I was in control of Jack’s schedule, what he ate, and any activities he did. So when I was training, I would try to micromanage what was happening in Jack’s life. I had to let go of that. By the time I flew in space, I had worked through it. 

The key is to have support and people you trust. My husband was home, but he was working. We had an amazing nanny, Lucy, who we just adored, and my mother-in-law helping. When I was in space, my husband and I had very good communication. I could talk to him on the phone every single day. But for a three year old, it was a little difficult. I made a video for him every single day on my iPad that I sent home. I had 166 videos saying, “Goodnight, I love you.” 

I did prepared myself for something, and I’m glad I did: coming home and him not wanting to come to me as the primary caregiver. And it happened. Jack had spent a lot of time with my mother-in-law. So the first night I was home, he wanted her to put him to bed—not me. Luckily, I prepared myself for that. I told myself, “I haven’t been here. I haven’t been the motherly figure to him for six months.” It only took a few days, and he was back to coming to me. 

Jessica: Now that your son is 10, would it feel harder to go to space?

Karen: I think so. I think it would be a lot harder to go right now than when he was three. I think he was fine with my husband going [a few months ago], but it probably was a little stressful for him. I anticipate it might have been more so if it had been me going this time.

‘Away’ on Netflix: What Is It Like to Actually Parent From Space?

Hilary: Karen, if you wouldn’t mind sharing the story you told me…. You don’t have to, but I find it really fascinating. 

Karen: Yeah, I don’t mind sharing it because there was a lot of emotion with it. After my first space shuttle flight, in 2008, I was really eager to go again. Extremely eager. But Doug and I were trying to have a child when I was assigned to the space mission STS-132. I was assigned to the flight and going to do spacewalks…and then I got pregnant. The frustrating part was that my baby was due well before the mission. I had gone to my commander, and we thought I could continue training, have the baby, and then do this mission. We had a plan—we had a backup in case something happened and I couldn’t continue training. 

And then I was taken off the flight. It was disappointing. But, like most things, it all worked out fine in the end. Peggy Whitson was the chief of the astronaut office at the time, and as soon as I came off maternity leave, she assigned me to a long-duration mission. She took care of me.

Hilary: Didn’t they call it a health crisis or something?

Karen: The official word that went out from NASA was that I was removed from the flight for a temporary medical condition. My son wasn’t quite so temporary. [Laughs.]

Glamour: One thing that struck me was watching Emma, a mother, trying to parent from space. Karen, you can actually speak to that unique experience.

Karen: I had to travel a lot for training. It was hard, but I had to learn to give up control. Doug was training when we first had my son Jack—for the first 18 months he was training for a space flight, so he was very busy. I was in control of Jack’s schedule, what he ate, and any activities he did. So when I was training, I would try to micromanage what was happening in Jack’s life. I had to let go of that. By the time I flew in space, I had worked through it. 

The key is to have support and people you trust. My husband was home, but he was working. We had an amazing nanny, Lucy, who we just adored, and my mother-in-law helping. When I was in space, my husband and I had very good communication. I could talk to him on the phone every single day. But for a three-year-old, it was a little difficult. I made a video for him every single day on my iPad that I sent home. I had 166 videos saying, “Good night, I love you.” 

I did prepare myself for something, and I’m glad I did: coming home and him not wanting to come to me as the primary caregiver. And it happened. Jack had spent a lot of time with my mother-in-law. So the first night I was home, he wanted her to put him to bed—not me. Luckily, I prepared myself for that. I told myself, “I haven’t been here. I haven’t been the motherly figure to him for six months.” It only took a few days, and he was back to coming to me. 

Jessica: Now that your son is 10, would it feel harder to go to space?

Karen: I think so. I think it would be a lot harder to go right now than when he was three. I think he was fine with my husband going [a few months ago], but it probably was a little stressful for him. I anticipate it might have been more so if it had been me going this time.

Marsai Martin’s Guide to Clapping Back With Grace

Also, I always make sure that whatever’s keeping me down I lift it up with something that’s making me happy. Whether that’s listening to some of my favorite music to binge-watching TV shows. With people that bring you down with negativity, you always have to bring it back with positivity. Balance.

What Marsai wants every young Black girl to know about her hair

Our hair is our crown. It’s our temple. It really brings out your personality. I feel like with me, the more I grow up, I like to change my hair based on my mood. It makes me happy. I want other young Black girls like me to know that your hair is your hair. You can do whatever you want with it, and don’t let anyone change that. If you believe that your hair is amazing as it is, do whatever you want with it. Because it’s yours. And hair keeps growing! Whether you want to cut it or do whatever, it’s yours. I want to keep preaching that to people, because that’s what makes you who you are—being comfortable with all of you.

Marsai’s advice for first-time voters and teens who are too young to head to the polls

For me, I still can’t vote, and I try to find ways to spread my platform and raise my voice. If you’re a young Black teen out there who thinks their voice isn’t heard, I believe that God has given you a voice for a reason, and that’s for you to speak your mind and be confident in what you’re saying. Every voice matters, especially during this time when we need a change in the world and people are finally recognizing that.

I feel like we, as young Black girls, should be a part of the change and a part of the shift. For the girls that are just getting into voting, don’t be pressured into choosing something you don’t believe is right for our nation. Really, every person has a platform. It doesn’t matter how many followers you have or any of that. Whether you’re at school, whether you’re in your house talking to your loved ones, whether you’re talking to your peers, everyone has a platform. And everyone needs to use it.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Star Trek Just Cast the First Transgender and Nonbinary Characters in Franchise History

Star Trek is one of the longest-running franchises in Hollywood history with its many films, spinoffs, and TV iterations.

Now, the show is making history by casting its first transgender and nonbinary actors in roles for the upcoming third season of Star Trek: Discovery, which streams on CBS All-Access. “Welcome Blu del Barrio and @ianaIexander to the #StarTrekFamily! They will be playing Adira, Star Trek‘s first nonbinary character, and Gray, Star Trek‘s first transgender character in #StarTrekDiscovery Season 3,” the show’s official Twitter handle tweeted. 

Star Trek has always made a mission of giving visibility to underrepresented communities because it believes in showing people that a future without division on the basis of race, gender, gender identity or sexual orientation is entirely within our reach,” Michelle Paradise, co-showrunner and executive producer, said in a statement, per Insider. 

You may recognize Alexander (who uses he/him and they/them pronouns) from Netflix’s The OA, where they played Buck. “I think being on The OA actually really helped them realize that I can be happy and I can be successful as a trans person and as a queer person,” they told Ellen DeGeneres in 2019. “Being on set for The OA was the first time I heard my mom use my correct name and pronouns, so that made my heart soar and made me realize they can accept this and other people can accept this and I can be just fully accepted for who I am in this environment.”

Del Barrio (who uses they/them pronouns) is more of a newcomer to the Hollywood scene. They spoke with GLAAD about this breakthrough new Star Trek role. “Adira is a wonderfully complex character. Mainly because of this duality they have within them: they’re astonishingly intelligent and yet they’re still a kid,” they said. “They experience their emotions at a heightened level, like most teenagers. That’s what makes them so fun to play. I like to describe them as cerebrally brilliant and emotionally a puppy. Adira is an introvert, but they keep a few people close to the chest, which I definitely resonate with. I don’t want to say too much and get in trouble, but all in all, Adira is a uniquely strange and beautiful character.”

They also spoke about gender diversity and being nonbinary. “It took me a very long time to find a word that could help me understand my gender, and honestly I am still figuring out who I am. This is because we live in a society built around a binary. Everything, and I mean everything, is gendered. It’s either made for men, or made for women,” del Barrio said. “Nonbinary is an umbrella term for any identity that does not neatly fit into that binary…For many nonbinary people, myself included, finding the language to match what you feel can be very difficult. 

They continued, “The way we think and talk about gender has to change. Our societal norms surrounding gender have to change, because nonbinary people deserve to live in a world where they fit.”

Hopefully, representation on shows like Star Trek will help make that a reality. 

Mulan Movie Review: The Live-Action Adaptation Wasn’t What I Expected—But I Still Felt Seen

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

After 22 years, Mulan, the classic 1998 Disney animated movie, has finally been remade into an energetic live-action movie. Available to stream on Disney+, this Mulan movie joins the ranks of other successful adaptations including The Lion King, Aladdin, and Beauty and the Beast. Its original release date was set for March of this year but, like everything else in 2020, that was pushed back due to the coronavirus. One silver lining: The delay has possibly worked in the film’s favor, as the slowing trickle of new releases has only stoked our anticipation of fresh content. In short, the comeback of Disney’s only Asian warrior princess is more necessary than ever.

The animated Mulan movie was a revelation for me two decades ago when I was a rebellious Asian American kid. In the story, Mulan impersonates a male soldier to fight in the imperial army in place of her disabled father. Like Mulan, I was sick of being held to the expectations of obedient Asian femininity. I identified with the film so much that I knew the lyrics of every song by heart, while my sister dressed up as her for Halloween. Mulan was our Disney princess.

But parents of young kids, be warned: This new PG-13 adaptation is far from the sanguine animation you watched back then. Friendly sidekicks Mushu and Cri-Kee are gone, and the musical numbers have been cast aside in favor of gritty battle sequences. The reboot is swifter and darker and even features a new foe for Mulan, a witch with a tortured backstory played by Li Gong of Memoirs of a Geisha. The film also has an international all-star Asian cast, much like the strong representation seen in Crazy Rich Asians. Ming-Na Wen, who voiced the animated Mulan, even makes a surprise cameo as an announcer in the imperial court.

Everett Collection
Everett Collection

But the heart of the film—the story of a woman rebelling against a traditional society–remains. The movie successfully establishes Mulan’s contrarian spirit right from in the opening sequence, when she jumps off a high building in her village to catch a chicken. Still, it’s hard not to compare this remake to the original, especially when you are, like me, a long-time fan.

One improvement in the live-action version are the rich costumes and set design, the matchmaking scene in particular. The film captures the playful mood of the original through a surreal blur of bright hues, the swirl of fabrics and powders, and the outrageous matchmaker who is hilariously portrayed by Pei-Pei Cheng (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon). The original’s scene was set to the soaring “Honor To Us All,” but the music was missing here—something that’s felt throughout the film.

As a kid, I loved the emotional score that became the soundtrack to my life. “Reflection,” recorded by Lea Salonga, expressed what I was going through at the time. (“Somehow I cannot hide who I am though I’ve tried / When will my reflection show who I am inside?”) In this version, I kept waiting for a rousing anthem or even a nod to the original songs, but I only heard instrumental whispers. They were missed.

As in the animation, we watch as Mulan, brilliantly played by Yifei Liu, passes herself off as a soldier by binding her breasts, avoiding showers, and proving herself during training to be the best fighter. The dialogue between characters about a woman’s place, ideal femininity, and honor is truly cringe-worthy, especially since I’ve dealt with these values before. While I’m always disgusted by on-screen misogyny, the point of this film is to show how Mulan transcends such circumstances. And through director Niki Caro’s thoughtful filmmaking, the movie adeptly demonstrates how she not only overcomes but slays these sexist expectations.

While I know this is a story about a warrior, I didn’t expect it to be such an action film, especially since the original was done with such levity and humor. While the fight scenes went on for what seemed like a long time in the second half of the movie, the impressive battle move when Mulan causes an avalanche is expertly recreated. In the end, Mulan saves the emperor and the kingdom and returns home to be reunited with her father Zhou, who is beautifully brought to life by legendary Asian American actor Tzi Ma.

Watching the live-action Mulan was like going back in time. I remembered what it was like to be that misunderstood little girl, and I felt all the feels. Overall, the remake is a proud moment—while the movie didn’t exactly hit all of my high expectations, seeing Asian people act out a story of an Asian woman’s resistance was emotional. The casting was skillfully done with respect, which is crucial for a story about people of color produced in Hollywood. It felt like an affirmation for me and every non-traditional Asian American.

In a time when hate crimes against Asians have spiked due to coronavirus accusations, Mulan is a small victory we need. For Mulan purists, the remake might not be what they expected—but as an Asian American rebel, I felt seen.

Minhae Shim Roth is a writer and reporter based in the San Francisco Bay Area.

13 Face Mask Chains for Staying Socially Distant in Style

Face masks are a necessary look, but face mask chains are a next-level vibe. The stylish utility trend is having a moment on Instagram, and it’s easy to see why so many people have gotten behind the accessory. They’re just like sunglasses holders, but for your reusable cotton or silk face masks

Face mask chains clip onto your earloops, dangle effortlessly below your chin, and hover gracefully over your chest like an oversized necklace. Apart from being another pretty piece of jewelry, they help keep your mask on you at all times—while also solving the ear dangle or chin strap situation you may resort to when temporarily pulling your mask off. 

For something that’s become such a large part of our daily life, odds are you’re still getting used to bringing a face covering with you, well, everywhere. And if you’re looking for a simple accessory to make toting your mask easier or want to jazz up your socially-distant look, this trend has plenty going for it. Plus, if and when face masks become a distant memory, you can repurpose them for keeping your sunglasses closeby. 

The variety of face mask chain styles is growing by the day, so whether you’re feeling those pearly accents, dainty daisies, or actual gold chains—we have options. Shop our favorite face mask chains below.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

The & Other Stories Labor Day Sale Has Everything You Need For Fall

There are plenty of sales worth shopping this holiday weekend, but instead of putting your coins toward swimsuits, sunglasses, and summer-centric deals, the & Other Stories Labor Day sale has fall-ready wardrobe staples you can wear for months ahead. Need some light coats? You’re literally covered. How about an oversized blazer? It’s got that too. Thinking about testing the waters (inexpensively) on a dress trend? Hello, puff sleeves. 

& Other Stories’ end-of-season event is filled with key fall outfit essentials that won’t put a major dent in your bank account, and from September 4 to September 7, you can take an extra 20% off the retailer’s already major sale section. Just make sure to use the code EXTRA20 at checkout. 

We’ve fallen down an & Other Stories rabbit hole more than a few times, so we’ve narrowed it down to 11 can’t-miss styles to shop now. Browse them below, then venture into the stacked sale section yourself. 

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

The Wash-Day Products Chrissy Got the Coils Swears By for Type 4 Hair

Watching Christal Lewis do her thing on YouTube and Instagram is like taking a master class on wash-and-gos. The Philadelphia-based content creator’s feeds are filled with endless inspiration and tutorials on how to make thick, low porosity, type 4 coils pop. 

“I treat my hair as another self-care routine,” says Lewis, who goes by her channel name Chrissy Got the Coils online. In 2018, Lewis decided to start a YouTube channel after experimenting with different styles and wanted to teach others practical ways to take care of their hair.

“I was always doing hairstyles with added hair, like different designs, tribal braids, twists, box braids, etc., and my friends would ask if I could do their hair,” she says. “I also felt like when I was watching a lot of tutorials, some channels left out a lot of details, and they always talked about irrelevant topics instead of getting to the point.” 

She channeled that frustration into hyper-specific and succinct walk-throughs on everything from how to DIY your own hair masks (she has a ton of different formulas she’s made), how to do your own jumbo knotless box braids, reviews on the best deep conditioners, and so much more. 

But when she’s not experimenting for her 60,000+ followers, here’s the wash-day routine she falls back on time and time again.

Pre-poo

My pre-poo is cost effective and all natural: okra. It’s a very slippery detangler. Okra gel is rich in Vitamins A, C, and B, as well as protein, magnesium, iron, calcium, and folate.

I start with a frozen bag of okra (which you can buy at the grocery store for less than $2) and let it defrost for a few minutes. Then, I combine the okra with some water in a pot and boil it for 20 to 30 minutes. Using a strainer, I strain out the gel from the cooked okra into another bowl. After it cools, I puts the gel in a spray bottle and spray it onto my roots and hair, then detangle in sections with the Felicia Leatherwood Detangler Brush.

Felicia Leatherwood Original Detangler Brush

Felicia Leatherwood

$18

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Shampoo

This step is usually the quickest step. I use a moisturizing shampoo, like Shea Moisture Raw Shea Butter Moisture Retention Shampoo. If my curls have been loosening and haven’t been holding moisture, I’ll use a clay wash mask in the place of a shampoo. This helps clear my hair pores of any unnecessary built up dirt and oils. My hair is low porosity, meaning my hair pores are normally closed, so they can trap a lot of unnecessary oils and dirt over a period of time.