AOC’s Tribute to RBG Is Giving People Hope

While mourning the passing of Supreme Court justice and feminist titan Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez—often referred to as AOC—took to Instagram to answer the lingering question: What do we do now?

“It’s a really incredibly sad day and evening,” she began her 40 minute long Instagram Live video. “On today of all days, Rosh Hashanah. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as the first Jewish woman to sit on the Supreme Court, to pass on such a high holiday just adds even more weight and significance to this moment, particularly for our brothers and sisters in the Jewish community that are feeling the duality of that.”

“I wanted to hop on because a lot of people were reaching out to me on Twitter and publicly and privately saying, ‘What now? What do we do? I’m scared,’” she continued. AOC—the youngest woman ever elected to congress_understands that fear. Ginsburg’s final wish, after all, was that her vacancy in the court not be filled until a new president is in office. There is simply too much at stake. In AOC’s own words, it’s “earth-shattering.”

“This kind of vacancy and this kind of tipping point is the difference between people having reproductive rights and the government controlling people’s bodies for them,” AOC explained. “This kind of vacancy makes the difference between LGBT people having marriage equality and full rights and the difference between labor protections and your ability to be protected at work and your boss not being able to violate your rights. This vacancy is the difference between having healthcare or not.”

But this is not the time to let fear overwhelm us, implores AOC. “I want to hop on tonight to talk to you about why now—this moment—is not the time for despair,” she said. “It is not the time for cynicism. It is not the time to give up. It is not the time to say, ‘it’s too far gone,’ or,  ‘I don’t know what to do.’ We’re going to talk about it right now because it is not hyperbole that the actual balance of our democracy rests in the actions that we choose to make, that I choose to make, that you choose to make as an individual between now and Election day.”

Watch the full video, below. 

AOC had a message, specifically, for those who are against President Donald Trump, but disinterested in voting for the Democratic nominee, Joe Biden:  “I understand why people say, ‘I don’t vote,'” she admitted. “I’m not here to dismiss you, I’m not here to poopoo you, I’m not here to say you’re wrong or that you’re a bad person. I’m here to say that this year, this election, voting for Joe Biden is not about whether you agree with him, It’s a vote to let our democracy live another day.”

People on Twitter are praising AOC and sharing many fighting words in this monumentous moment. “So AOC is giving the most inspiring speech/pep talk I’ve heard in a while right now on IG Live,” Zameena Mejia wrote on Twitter. “This is how I like to spend my Friday nights, getting hype to protect our democracy.” 

In honor of RBG, AOC, and the many women who have fought and continue to fight for our rights, make sure you’re registered to vote

Read Every Word of Ruth Bader Ginsberg’s 2012 Glamour Woman of the Year Speech

The loss of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, supreme court justice and champion of women, is immeasurable. In her two decades on the bench, and long before, she has passionately defended the rights of all people, especially those who are underserved. “More than any other person, she can take credit for making the law of this country work for women. She is a transformational figure…and for me, an inspiration,” fellow supreme court justice Elena Kagan told Glamour in 2012, when the magazine honored Ginsberg with a lifetime achievement award at that year’s Women of the Year ceremony. 

Ginsberg was presented her award by her friend Nina Totenberg, the American legal affairs correspondent for National Public Radio. “To the unschooled, she might seem an unlikely superwoman. Soft spoken, diminutive, and very shy with those huge glasses on top of her nose. But let me tell you: Ruth Bader Ginsberg quite simply changed the world for women,” Totenberg said as she took the stage. “As a young lawyer, she led the fight for gender equality. And by the time she herself donned supreme court judicial robes and a white lace collar in 1993, Justice Ginsberg had worked a revolution. At her confirmation hearing, she predicted that in her lifetime she hoped there would be three, four or more supreme court justices who were women. Speaking as a journalist who covered the all-male supreme court for 13 years, I can tell you that when I walk into that chamber now and see that her prediction has come true with three women on the bench—one at each side, and Justice Ginsberg very close to the center—my heart just skips a beat.” 

Ruth Bader Ginsberg at the 2012 Glamour Women of the Year Awards

Dimitrios Kambouris

Below is an excerpt of Ginsberg’s speech—to quote the feminist icon herself, we are tremendously indebted to her. Her lucky number may have been two, but she was first in our hearts. 

“The judiciary is not a profession that ranks very high among the glamorously attired. In fact, the black robes judges wear leave little room for stylistic innovation. In fact, judges’ robes are made with men’s ties and trouser pockets in mind. Taking a cue from our colleagues abroad, Justice O’Connor and I broke the plain black monotony by wearing a variety of lace collars, and we also added sewn-in pockets. Not very long ago the only way to distinguish the justices, at least in appearance, was to separate the bearded from the close-shaven. Is it not…a wonderful sign of progress that three women now serve on our supreme court and no one confuses me with Justice Sotomayor or Justice Kagan? 

“Most of my life, my lucky number has been two. Second woman to be appointed to the U.S. court of appeals for the District of Columbia circuit, and then second woman to the supreme court of the United States. But I am tremendously indebted to Glamour for making me first. First supreme court justice named Glamour Woman of the Year. Justice O’Connor, who has been designated first in almost everything said, ‘Ruth, that’s fine, you will soon be 80. It is high time.’ A thousand thanks for tonight’s delight, and every good wish to all of you.”

Read Every Word of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s 2012 Glamour Woman of the Year Speech

The loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, supreme court justice and champion of women, is immeasurable. In her two decades on the bench, and long before, she has passionately defended the rights of all people, especially those who are underserved. “More than any other person, she can take credit for making the law of this country work for women. She is a transformational figure…and for me, an inspiration,” fellow supreme court justice Elena Kagan told Glamour in 2012. 

The magazine honored Ginsburg that year with a lifetime achievement award at the annual Women of the Year ceremony. (Ginsburg also famously received her favorite “dissent collar” in the event’s gift bags.) The supreme court justice was presented her award by her friend Nina Totenberg, the American legal affairs correspondent for National Public Radio. 

“To the unschooled, she might seem an unlikely superwoman. Soft spoken, diminutive, and very shy with those huge glasses on top of her nose. But let me tell you: Ruth Bader Ginsburg quite simply changed the world for women,” Totenberg said as she took the stage. “As a young lawyer, she led the fight for gender equality. And by the time she herself donned supreme court judicial robes and a white lace collar in 1993, Justice Ginsburg had worked a revolution. At her confirmation hearing, she predicted that in her lifetime she hoped there would be three, four or more supreme court justices who were women. Speaking as a journalist who covered the all-male supreme court for 13 years, I can tell you that when I walk into that chamber now and see that her prediction has come true with three women on the bench—one at each side, and Justice Ginsburg very close to the center—my heart just skips a beat.” 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the 2012 Glamour Women of the Year Awards

Dimitrios Kambouris

Below is an excerpt of Ginsburg’s speech—to quote the feminist icon herself, we are tremendously indebted to her. Her lucky number may have been two, but she was first in our hearts. 

“The judiciary is not a profession that ranks very high among the glamorously attired. In fact, the black robes judges wear leave little room for stylistic innovation. In fact, judges’ robes are made with men’s ties and trouser pockets in mind. Taking a cue from our colleagues abroad, Justice O’Connor and I broke the plain black monotony by wearing a variety of lace collars, and we also added sewn-in pockets. Not very long ago the only way to distinguish the justices, at least in appearance, was to separate the bearded from the close-shaven. Is it not…a wonderful sign of progress that three women now serve on our supreme court and no one confuses me with Justice Sotomayor or Justice Kagan? 

“Most of my life, my lucky number has been two. Second woman to be appointed to the U.S. court of appeals for the District of Columbia circuit, and then second woman to the supreme court of the United States. But I am tremendously indebted to Glamour for making me first. First supreme court justice named Glamour Woman of the Year. Justice O’Connor, who has been designated first in almost everything said, ‘Ruth, that’s fine, you will soon be 80. It is high time.’ A thousand thanks for tonight’s delight, and every good wish to all of you.”

Read Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s 2012 ‘Glamour’ Woman of the Year Speech

The loss of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court justice and champion of women, is immeasurable. In her two decades on the bench, and long before, she has passionately defended the rights of all people, especially those who are underserved. “More than any other person, she can take credit for making the law of this country work for women. She is a transformational figure…and for me, an inspiration,” fellow Supreme Court justice Elena Kagan told Glamour in 2012. 

The magazine honored Ginsburg that year with a lifetime achievement award at the annual Women of the Year ceremony. (Ginsburg also famously received her favorite “dissent collar” in the event’s gift bag.) The Supreme Court justice was presented her award by her friend Nina Totenberg, the American legal affairs correspondent for National Public Radio. 

“To the unschooled, she might seem an unlikely superwoman. Soft spoken, diminutive, and very shy with those huge glasses on top of her nose. But let me tell you: Ruth Bader Ginsburg quite simply changed the world for women,” Totenberg said as she took the stage. “As a young lawyer, she led the fight for gender equality. And by the time she herself donned Supreme Court judicial robes and a white lace collar in 1993, Justice Ginsburg had worked a revolution. At her confirmation hearing, she predicted that in her lifetime she hoped there would be three, four, or more Supreme Court justices who were women. Speaking as a journalist who covered the all-male Supreme Court for 13 years, I can tell you that when I walk into that chamber now and see that her prediction has come true with three women on the bench—one at each side, and Justice Ginsburg very close to the center—my heart just skips a beat.” 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the 2012 Glamour Women of the Year Awards

Dimitrios Kambouris

Below is an excerpt of Ginsburg’s speech—to quote the feminist icon herself, we are tremendously indebted to her. Her lucky number may have been two, but she was first in our hearts. 

“The judiciary is not a profession that ranks very high among the glamorously attired. In fact, the black robes judges wear leave little room for stylistic innovation. In fact, judges’ robes are made with men’s ties and trouser pockets in mind. Taking a cue from our colleagues abroad, Justice O’Connor and I broke the plain black monotony by wearing a variety of lace collars, and we also added sewn-in pockets. Not very long ago the only way to distinguish the justices, at least in appearance, was to separate the bearded from the close-shaven. Is it not…a wonderful sign of progress that three women now serve on our Supreme Court, and no one confuses me with Justice Sotomayor or Justice Kagan? 

“Most of my life, my lucky number has been two. Second woman to be appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia circuit, and then second woman to the Supreme Court of the United States. But I am tremendously indebted to Glamour for making me first. First Supreme Court justice named Glamour Woman of the Year. Justice O’Connor, who has been designated first in almost everything said, ‘Ruth, that’s fine, you will soon be 80. It is high time.’ A thousand thanks for tonight’s delight, and every good wish to all of you.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Champion of Women, Dead at 87

Ruth Bader Ginsburg—Supreme Court justice, feminist, towering intellectual, pop culture icon—died on Friday. She was 87 years old. 

Ginsburg was the second woman to ever serve on the Supreme Court, after being appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993. She was celebrated for her powerful arguments and passionate defense of the defenseless for years before she attained status in popular culture as a diminutive icon of fairness and decency. The Supreme Court shared that her death was due to complications from metastatic pancreas cancer. She had previously survived colon cancer. 

The justice—known to her fans as The Notorious RBG, or just RBG—was celebrated for her lifetime of studying and teaching law, for her incisive questions from the bench, and ultimately, for her fiery dissents, written in the strongest of language, objecting to rulings by the court that she found unjust. She served as a symbol that strength and might are not determined by size, or gender, or anything much other than grit. One of few women in her law school class, she faced outright gender discrimination when looking for jobs after graduating, turning her focus to women’s rights. She co-founded the Women’s Rights Project at the ACLU, and her career as both a lawyer and ultimately Supreme Court justice were characterized by her strong defense of women’s rights. 

In a statement Ginsburg dictated to her granddaughter, Clara Spera, in the week before her death, she said, “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.” The vacancy on the court is likely to inspire a massive power struggle between Democrats and Republicans.  

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a legend among women and among Americans. We will think of her when we raise our hands in crowded classrooms, when we advocate for ourselves in job negotiations, when we lift up the silenced and ignored in our communities, and when we fill out our ballots. 

Jenny Singer is a staff writer for Glamour. You can follow her on Twitter.                                 

Gwyneth Paltrow Has Words for People Who Think ‘WAP’—or Her Vagina Candles—Are Vulgar

Gwyneth Paltrow’s goop brand and products are no stranger to controversy—remember the “vagina steaming” hoopla rom a few years back?—so all the press surrounding one of her new candles isn’t a surprise. There’s really nothing to make a fuss over; the candle is just called “Smells Like My Vagina.” But, of course, some people are up in arms about it. Scan Twitter, and you’ll find messages from users dissing the candle or calling it “weird.”  But Paltrow has a message for her detractors, as well as those who think Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s song “WAP” is vulgar. 

People who take issue with Paltrow’s candle probably have a problem with Cardi’s song, which is an abbreviation for “wet ass pussy.” It all seems to stem from the discomfort a large subset of the population has with women owning their bodies and sexuality. 

“It’s all part of the crumbling patriarchy,” Paltrow tells Elle in a new interview. “And I think that we’re all changing it by releasing like a punk rock, feminist candle and Cardi B. is changing it by her incredible lyrical prowess. You have to push, you have to go too far. You have to have a WAP song or a ‘Smells Like My Vagina’ candle. So people are like, ‘What is this?’ And they freak out. And then the center moves a little bit more this way. It’s a process that happens over time. But women, especially my generation, and my mother’s generation, we were raised to feel so uncomfortable with ourselves and it’s bullshit. It’s not cool. We have to be integrated and love ourselves, love every part and integrate all of the parts of ourselves. So I think it’s a good part of the process.”

Cardi B has a similar message for people who knock “WAP.” “The people that the song bothers are usually conservatives or really religious people, but my thing is I grew up listening to this type of music,” she said on the Australian radio show The Kyle and Jackie O Show. “Other people might think it’s strange and vulgar, but to me it’s almost like really normal, you know what I’m saying?”

She continued, “You wanna know something? It’s what people wanna hear. If people didn’t wanna hear it, if they were so afraid to hear it, it wouldn’t be doing as good.” 

Couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Now, where is the Gwyneth Paltrow-Cardi B collab the world needs?

Gwyneth Paltrow Has Words for People Who Think ‘WAP’—Or Her Vagina Candles—Is Vulgar

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop brand and products are no stranger to controversy—remember the “vagina steaming” hoopla from a few years back?—so all the press surrounding one of her new candles isn’t a surprise. There’s really nothing to make a fuss over; the candle is just called “Smells Like My Vagina.” But, of course, some people are up in arms about it. Scan Twitter, and you’ll find messages from users dissing the candle or calling it “weird.” But Paltrow has a message for her detractors, as well as those who think Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s song “WAP” is vulgar. 

People who take issue with Paltrow’s candle probably have a problem with Cardi’s song, which is an abbreviation for “wet ass pussy.” It all seems to stem from the discomfort a large subset of the population has with women owning their body and sexuality. 

“It’s all part of the crumbling patriarchy,” Paltrow tells Elle in a new interview. “And I think that we’re all changing it by releasing, like, a punk rock, feminist candle and Cardi B is changing it by her incredible lyrical prowess. You have to push, you have to go too far. You have to have a ‘WAP’ song or a ‘Smells Like My Vagina’ candle. So people are like, ‘What is this?’ And they freak out. And then the center moves a little bit more this way. It’s a process that happens over time. But women, especially my generation, and my mother’s generation, we were raised to feel so uncomfortable with ourselves and it’s bullshit. It’s not cool. We have to be integrated and love ourselves, love every part and integrate all of the parts of ourselves. So I think it’s a good part of the process.”

Cardi B has a similar message for people who knock “WAP.” “The people that the song bothers are usually conservatives or really religious people, but my thing is I grew up listening to this type of music,” she said on the Australian radio show The Kyle and Jackie O Show. “Other people might think it’s strange and vulgar, but to me it’s almost like really normal, you know what I’m saying?”

She continued, “You wanna know something? It’s what people wanna hear. If people didn’t wanna hear it, if they were so afraid to hear it, it wouldn’t be doing as good.” 

Couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Now, where is the Gwyneth Paltrow–Cardi B collab the world needs?

Did Gigi Hadid Give Birth? Here’s Why Everyone Thinks So

Gigi Hadid is out here posting more baby bump photos as if the rest of the world isn’t wildly speculating about whether or not she’s given birth to her first child with Zayn Malik

On September 17, Gigi posted four selfies from back when she was around 27 weeks pregnant. “Time flew,” she wrote in the caption—which seems like something one might say if they’d reached the finish line of a major milestone. Maybe. 

This fueled speculation that was already brewing after Hadid’s father, Mohamed, shared a since deleted poem to his (future?) grandchild called “Grandpa Heart” on September 16.

“Hello little grandchild, it is me, my heart as happy as can be,” he wrote in the poem, per People. “I wish for you the sun & moon, I wish for you a happy time. Know that grandpa’s always here, I’ll do anything, anything for you, my dear. When I heard you were on the way, I smiled and wiped a tear away. I cried the tear because I knew my heart would always belong to you.”

In the caption he also shared a heartfelt message for his supermodel daughter. “In the name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful, in peace, my love, Gigi,” Mohamed reportedly wrote in Arabic. “In the name of God The merciful I want to say l love you and so proud of you. @gigihadid.”

Obviously the internet did its thing, but Mohamed attempted to shut down the speculation. “No, not yet,” Mohamed replied to one user who asked if the baby had arrived, per Us Weekly.

Meanwhile, sister Bella Hadid shared a post that’s not helping matters. On September 15, Bella posted a funny pic and wrote she and Gigi both had “buns in the oven” after eating a burger. 

However, it’’ easy to see why fans would latch onto the post, considering the rest of the caption is pretty emotional. “I love you both so freaking much,” she wrote. “Can’tstopcrying.”

For what it’s worth, I guess we’ll just have to wait for the official confirmation from Gigi Hadid to know the truth. 

Cottagecore Is So Much More Than a Trend for These Five Black Influencers

People of color are making strides in standing up for themselves and refusing to be excluded. If you want to wear a flowy dress and go on a picnic, it is your absolute right to do so without the weight of political underpinnings.

Has the trend self-soothed or empowered you? 

It is both to me really. The ability to commune with nature, relax by reading a book, or just feel the sun on my skin are therapeutic to me. But there is also the reality that I am very fortunate to have the time to be able to do so when there are many that do not, is something that makes me all the more grateful.

Amy’s Cottagecore picks: 

The Ellie Nap Dress

$125

Hill House Home

The Athena Nap Dress

N/A

Hill House Home

Raphael Pale Blue Floral Maxi Dress

$195

House of CB

DIY Cheese & Cured Meat Board

$195

Lady & Larder

Courtesy of Nicole Ocran

Have you ever felt that the Cottagecore trend excluded Black women or WOC? 

I was an avid Little House on the Prairie watcher when I was growing up, I loved any and all iterations of Little WomenPride and Prejudice, and Emma. I truly never saw myself at all in Cottagecore until I saw the iconic Paula of Hill House Vintage. I immediately thought this is the warm and peaceful aesthetic that I’ve always craved seeing Black women in. We operate within this idea that Black women or WOC can’t be whimsical, or kitschy or playful and we absolutely can.

Do you find that Cottagecore willfully glosses over the roots of its nostalgia? 

There is a peace in the aesthetic, especially for someone like me who lives a very city lifestyle in general, where this open-air escape and warm sunlight feels like comfort in these times of real stress, anxiety, and uncertainty. I’m not blind to the roots of it, but like all movements and subcultures, there is a subversion here that still makes it relevant. As always and as ever Black folks contain multitudes! 

The outdoors have historically excluded Black people—is Cottagecore another way Black women are smashing stereotypes? 

Black women continue to smash stereotypes across all genres! It’s a total joy seeing us out on beautiful picnics, slowing down with good food, and taking our time. For me, it feels like putting ourselves first in spaces that have often wanted nothing to do with us. 

Have you participated in Cottagecore? If so, how? 

In more ways than I thought, really! I’ve been loving the hyperfeminine dresses, big billowy sleeves, straw hats, picnic baskets, and flowers—but in general, the getting outdoors and enjoying nature, especially during this lockdown period is something I never would’ve taken the time to explore before. My aesthetic is similar in a lot of ways. In general, I’ve never felt like a very “sexy” person, so that would never have worked for my fashion sense anyway. Cute, sweet, and kitschy is much more my vibe. 

Nicole’s Cottagecore picks: 

Voluminous Open Back Midi Dress

$179$125

& Other Stories

ArtNTiquesGallery Wicker Picnic Hamper

Lambswool Knee Blanket in Quiet Grey Gingham

$77

The Tartan Blanket Co.

70s Floral Print Satin Scarf

Prince William Reportedly Had the Best Reaction to Losing to Kate Middleton in a Bake-Off

Prince William is clearly used to losing to Kate Middleton.

During a visit to Beigel Bake Brick Lane Bakery earlier this week, the pair went full Great British Bake Off on some of the shop’s famous bagels. Elias Cohen—whose father, Amnon, opened the shop in 1974—ultimately ruled that the Duchess of Cambridge had the better dough ball-rolling technique. 

According to People, Prince William was…not surprised. “We’ll go with that,” he reportedly said. “The usual story.”

Looks about right.

WPA Pool

The duchess, on the other hand, was not so sure. “Just wait until you see the aftermath,” she reportedly replied. “I had beginner’s luck. They are getting worse!”

Unfortunately, there’s been no official word on who took home the grand prize after all was said and done, but the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge did share their experience on Instagram on September 16.

“A visit to one of London’s most iconic bagel shops to see behind the scenes,” the official Kensington Royal account wrote underneath the video. “@beigel_bake was forced to reduce their opening hours during the pandemic but is back to 24hrs and continuing to support their local community. 🥯”

WPA Pool/Getty Images

The bagel shop wasn’t the only stop on their outing this Tuesday, September 15. Prince William and Kate Middleton ventured to multiple London staples to learn more about how local businesses are coping amid the coronavirus pandemic

Despite Prince William’s implication that his wife’s win was a usual occurrence,  he  had much better luck during a visit to Wales last month. While playing games at an arcade, the duke ended up scoring a ton of tickets during a ball-throwing game, which the couple played together. Unfortunately, when the duchess attempted to grab a teddy from a claw machine—throwing up a thumbs up when she thought she had it in the bag—the bear slipped at the last minute. 

WPA Pool/Getty Images
WPA Pool

I guess the old saying is true: You win some, you lose some…