Jennifer Aniston Has a Vocal Habit on Friends You Probably Never Noticed

Jennifer Aniston became a household name after starring on the hit TV show, Friends. It’s difficult these days to find a person who doesn’t recognize her face, voice, or iconic hair. Aniston, however, has a bit of a vocal habit on the show you probably never recognized. It’s so subtle, fans of hers are now saying they “can’t stop hearing it” after it was brought to their attention in a viral TikTok video.

User cts.trphe recently posted a TikTok as part of a trend of people revealing “TV tropes.” The user began the video admitting that “technically this isn’t a trope,” but it would “ruin” big fans of the show’s lives. This, obviously, was enough to capture people’s attention despite the disclaimer because the video has 170,000+ likes. They added, “If you are a big fan of the show, I’m begging you, scroll away, because I’m going to ruin your life.”

They continued, “Jennifer Aniston has this vocal tic that she does at the beginning of every single sentence that she starts on any show that she’s in. It’s very specific and it’s very hard to unsee once you notice it.”

The video includes various clips from Friends of Aniston seeming to… clear her throat? Honestly, it’s kind of difficult to decipher what, exactly, she’s doing. What’s apparent, though, is that she does it a lot

One fan commented, “yes!! she does this so much. a lottt of people have crutches when acting when they don’t know what else to do. a lot of people sigh or grunt etc.” Another fan wrote, “I did notice it sometimes, I thought it was on purpose or part of the character. I didn’t know it was a Jen Aniston thing.” 

One fan put it plainly: “She does it in everything.” We need to do more research before confirming that, but if you didn’t notice the throat-clearing before, you’ll definitely notice now.

Matt James Just Broke His Silence on the Chris Harrison-Rachel Lindsay Situation

The Bachelor franchise is synonymous with the name Chris Harrison, who’s hosted both The Bachelor and The Bachelorette since their premieres in 2002 and 2003, respectively, plus the spin-off Bachelor in Paradise. But Harrison recently announced he’s “stepping back” from the program. Here’s what’s going on: 

First, some context.

If you’re not an avid Bachelor watcher, you might not know the current franchise lead, Matt James, is the first Black Bachelor in the show’s history. ABC announced this news in summer 2020, as Black Lives Matters protests erupted all over the country and the show came under fire for its lack of diversity. Because of James’s unique position, people were especially attuned to possible racial biases among the contestants.

Which leads us to Rachael Kirkconnell…

Rachael K., one of the women vying for James’s heart, attended an “Old South” party with her sorority when she was in college. Fans were quick to point out this was, at the least, an error in judgment on Kirkconnell’s part. Participating in an event like that is insensitive and, to many, offensive.

Harrison’s response to the story 

As backlash grew, Harrison went on Extra to address the story, appearing (virtually) with Rachel Lindsay, who broke barriers on the show as the first Black Bachelorette in 2017. “These girls got dressed up and went to a party and had a great time; they were 18 years old. Now, does that make it okay? I don’t know, Rachel, you tell me,” Harrison said. “Were we all looking through [that lens] in 2018?”

Harrison added, “This judge, jury, executioner thing where people are just tearing this girl’s life apart and diving into her parents, her parents’ voting record…. Until I actually hear this woman have a chance to speak, who am I to say any of this? I saw a picture of her at a sorority party five years ago, and that’s it.” 

In a statement posted to their Instagram pages, many of the current contestants on The Bachelor voiced their support for Rachel Lindsay, whom they felt Harrison talked over in the Extra segment, and collectively denounced racism and any defense of it. Lindsay responded, saying the message “[meant] everything” to her.

Kirkconnell and Harrison both apologized.

Pretty much immediately after, both main players in this story posted apologies online. Kirkconnell took responsibility for her mistake and promised to earn forgiveness through future actions, not just by saying sorry now. She also reposed the statement in support of Lindsay. 

Harrison wrote in his own statement, “What…I have done is cause harm by wrongly speaking in a manner that perpetuates racism, and for that I am so deeply sorry. I also apologize to my friend Rachel Lindsay for not listening to her better on a topic she has firsthand understanding of.”

It’s unclear for how long, but we know for sure Harrison won’t be hosting this year’s “After the Final Rose” special. 

Rachel Lindsay called Chris Harrison’s leave of absence the right move.

“Like he said, he needs to take time to get educated and on a profound and productive level to use his word,” she told Extra, per People. “And I think he needs to understand what was done, what was wrong, and what he said in that interview, and he needs time. He’s stepped away to do that.”

She continued, “I think [the interview] was a moment for people to recognize what was being said and to learn and grow from it, which is what we’re seeing happen now with Chris.” 

Tayshia Adams agreed this is a good step for Harrison.

On the February 18 episode of the Click Bait With Bachelor Nation podcast, Adams, the second Black female lead in franchise history, praised Harrison’s decision and his words.

“I think after reading his apology…it hit my heart a little bit more to know he actually meant what he was saying,” she said, per People. “He said, ‘By excusing historical racism I defended it’ which is the absolute truth, and the fact that he called that out and owned up to that and he acknowledges that, means a lot to me…Also the fact that he said, ‘This is not just a moment but a commitment to much greater understanding that I will actively make each day’ also meant a lot to me, because it isn’t just a moment, just like how Blacks Lives Matter isn’t just a trending topic on Instagram.”

She continued, “I think that by him taking ownership, and just not just saying issue an apology and then just going back to work the next day like nothing happened speaks volumes on his behalf.”

This post will be updated as the situation evolves.

Checkered Nails Are Officially the Coolest Manicure of the Season

Take a look at all the coolest girls you know and chances are they have something in common: They’re rocking checkered nails. In the past few weeks it’s been impossible to scroll Instagram without seeing the graphic pattern incorporated into French tips, retro florals, and mismatched manis. Blame it on the popularity of The Queen’s Gambit or Lisa Says Gah, the fashion darling of the moment, but there’s no doubt it’s happening. 

And by “happening,” we mean it’s everywhere. No longer limited to board games or classic Vans, the pattern has been popping up on home goods, clothing, and phone cases with fun twists like poppy pastels and wavy edges. In fact, it’s having such a moment, it’s a cornerstone of what fashion fans have cheekily coined the Avant Basic aesthetic—think Paloma Wool matching sets, Wildflower phone cases, and colorful carpets. 

When it comes to nails, twists on the pattern are equally as playful. One of the most popular versions, first posted by content creator Lauren Ladnier and frequently copied across the app, features the pattern in swooping French tips and varying colors. The color palette and off-kilter lines make it feel almost groovy and ’70s, but the graphic print keeps it feeling modern and cool. 

Part of the pattern’s appeal is its versatility. Done in black and white, it looks clean and classic—or even emo, depending on the circumstances. Paired with flowers, it’s psychedelic, like a Spongebob Squarepants background come to life. And covering a whole nail, it’s total Nascar vibes, in the coolest way possible. 

If you’re skilled with a detail brush, check out the tutorial, below. For the rest of us, either leave checkered nails to a pro or go for press-ons. Both Chillhouse’s and Etsy’s extensive sticker selections can help you get the look.  

Chillhouse Chill Tips in Checked Out

$16

Chillhouse

Ayannas Parlor Checkered Life Nail Wraps

And if you’re not feeling the time or patience it takes to get checkered nails, you can always take the trend to your closet. Trust us, there are a ridiculous number of great ’fits to be made. But if you need a good starting point, shop some of our favorite checkered pieces, below. 

Lisa Says Gah Emma Sweater

$169

Lisa Says Gah

Wildflower Crazy Checkers iPhone Case

$35

Wildflower

Iets Frans Black & White Check Sweater Vest

$54

Urban Outfitters

Lisa Says Gah Robyn Jeans

$159

Lisa Says Gah

Paloma Wool El Valle Top

$170

Paloma Wool

Lisa Says Gah Heidi Throw Blanket

$179

Lisa Says Gah

Bella Cacciatore is the beauty associate at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @bellacacciatore_.

Checker Nails Are Officially the Coolest Manicure of the Season

Take a look at all the coolest girls you know and chances are they have something in common: they’re all rocking checker nails. In the past few weeks, it’s been impossible to scroll Instagram without seeing the graphic pattern incorporated into French tips, retro florals, and mismatched manis. Blame it on the popularity of The Queen’s Gambit or Lisa Says Gah, the fashion darling of the moment, but there’s no doubt it’s happening. 

And by “happening,” we mean it’s everywhere. No longer limited to board games or classic Vans, the pattern has been popping up on home goods, clothing, and phone cases with fun twists like poppy pastels and wavy edges. In fact, it’s having such a moment, it’s a corner stone of what fashion fans have cheekily coined the “Avant Basic” aesthetic—think Paloma Wool matching sets, Wildflower phone cases, and colorful carpets. 

When it comes to nails, twists on the pattern are equally as playful. One of the most popular versions, first posted by content creator Lauren Ladnier and frequently copied across the app, features the pattern in swooping French tips and varying colors. The color palette and off-kilter lines make it feel almost groovy and ’70s, but the graphic print keeps it feeling modern and cool. 

Part of the pattern’s appeal is its versatility. Done in black and white, it looks clean and classic—or even emo, depending on the circumstances. Paired with flowers it’s psychedelic, like a Spongebob Squarepants background come to life. And covering a whole nail, it’s total Nascar vibes, in the coolest way possible. 

If you’re skilled with a detail brush, check out the tutorial, below. For the rest of us, either leave checker nails a pro or go for press-ons. Both Chillhouse and Etsy’s extensive sticker selection can help you easily get the look.  

Chillhouse Chill Tips in Checked Out

$16

Chillhouse

Ayannas Parlor Checkered Life Nail Wraps

And if you’re not feeling the time or patience it takes to get checker nails, you can always take the trend to your closet. Trust us, there are a ridiculous number of great ‘fits to be made. But if you need a good starting point, shop some of our favorite checker pieces, below. 

Lisa Says Gah Emma Sweater

$169

Lisa Says Gah

Wildflower Crazy Checkers iPhone Case

$35

Wildflower

iets frans Black & White Check Sweater Vest

$54

Urban Outfitters

Lisa Says Gah Robyn Jean

$159

Lisa Says Gah

Paloma Wool El Valle top

$170

Paloma Wool

Lisa Says Gah Heidi Throw Blanket

$179

Lisa Says Gah

Bella Cacciatore is the beauty associate at Glamour. Follow her on Instagram @bellacacciatore_.

Meghan Markle—And Her Super Long, Wavy Hair—Just Made a Surprise Video Appearance

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry just made their first appearance since permanently stepping down as senior working royals and announcing they’re expecting another baby.

On February 22, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex popped up for a surprise segment on Spotify’s Stream On event to reveal more details about their production company, Archewell Audio, which will develop podcasts exclusively for Spotify. 

From their home in California, Markle—who’s now sporting super long, wavy hair—discussed the goal of their new project. “We created Archewell Audio to make sure that we can elevate voices that maybe aren’t being heard and hear people’s stories,” she said, per People. 

Prince Harry added, “And the biggest part of this is to create this community of where you can share, that will encourage everybody else to then share their own vulnerabilities within that safe space.”

You can watch them open up around the 50-minute mark:

While the appearance was unexpected, it comes at a busy and exciting time for the couple. Following their Valentine’s Day announcement that baby Archie will soon be an older brother, Buckingham Palace released a statement that the two are officially relinquishing their royal titles, duties, and various patronages. 

“The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have confirmed to Her Majesty The Queen that they will not be returning as working members of The Royal Family,” a statement released on February 19 read. “Following conversations with The Duke, The Queen has written confirming that in stepping away from the work of The Royal Family it is not possible to continue with the responsibilities and duties that come with a life of public service.”

After outlining the changes to their duties, the queen’s message concluded, “While all are saddened by their decision, The Duke and Duchess remain much-loved members of the family.”

However, it seemed Meghan Markle and Prince Harry offered a slight correction with their own statement later that day. “As evidenced by their work over the past year, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex remain committed to their duty and service to the U.K. and around the world, and have offered their continued support to the organizations they have represented regardless of official role,” a spokesman for the couple shared. “We can all live a life of service. Service is universal.”

Markle will be discussing all of this for the first time in a new, wide-ranging interview with Oprah Winfrey on March 7. Mark your calendars. 

Lily Tomlin, Forever

How does it feel, having played so many roles that make people feel seen and validated, but not alienated? How does it feel to be beloved?

“Well, however many days it lasts,” Tomlin says, cheerily.

In 1962, Tomlin left college, borrowed $5 from nine friends and flew to New York to try out show business. “I was going to study mime and be a waitress,” she says, with a laugh. “That was a very cool plan at the time.” 

She wore a $2 cream-colored trench coat from a thrift shop and pinned her hair on top of her head with a scarf, like Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s, which had come out the year before. A friend let her crash in her railroad apartment over B&H Dairy on 2nd Avenue. The bathroom was down the hall, the walls were covered with curse words, and Tomlin slept on top of a box. “The roaches were un-be-lievable,” she says in her sing-song, very Lily Tomlin way, enunciating every syllable, relishing the filthiness of it all.

When Tomlin first got famous, she would sometimes get mobbed by young people. They would go crazy around her, asking her how she did it, how she made people scream with laughter. “I’d say to them, ‘Look, I don’t know anything you don’t know.’ And I had to walk away,” she says. “I couldn’t foster that feeling of either admiration that they’re feigning or—even if it’s the most sincere thing in the world, it’s not really to be fostered.” Even decades later, she uses that word—feigning—dubious that her talent could inspire so much love.

But in character, she could do anything, connect with anyone. Teenagers would sleep on the streets to be first in line to buy tickets to her shows, and she would come out dressed to the nines, in a wig, and hand out donuts as the box office opened. She toured compulsively. “I’d have to go out and tour and show the hardcore fans what certain characters were up to,” she says, like it’s obvious. Her work, her success, has been a joy. But, “It’s not infinite, it’s not magical, it’s just life.”

Tomlin grew up in Detroit, in a blue-collar, predominantly Black neighborhood. Her apartment building was on the edge of a wealthier district, which meant school was a mix of poor and middle class kids and, just streets over, the Ford family. “I saw through it so much,” she says of the extreme class differences, the racism, the way it was all swept under the rug. In grade school, teachers would make every kid stand up and say what they got for Christmas, and Tomlin would itch with anxiety over those who had nothing to share. “I was so worried about them because they would have to get up and sometimes they would start to lie about it and I knew they were lying,” she says. “I would be identifying with them—there were inequities in the culture that bothered me at that time and continue to bother me.” But it was another time, and she wanted to be a star, so she kept quiet.

How Mindy Kaling Sleeps At Night

Mindy Kaling has figured out a way to get more than 24 hours out of her day. At least that’s how it seems given the actor/producer/writer/director has one of the busiest professional lives on the planet and a 3-year-old and a 6-month-old at home. Sleep is precious—if not scarce these days. “With my daughter, I obviously went through the whole thing of waking up every three hours to feed her. But what they say is true: you completely forget about that when you have another kid. I’m in the midst of that now [with my son],” Kaling says.

The result is that Kaling has gotten intimately familiar with what she calls the “murder zone.” “I’ve decided that the worst time I have to wake up and set the alarm is the one that’s between 3 a.m. and 6 a.m.,” Kaling says. “It’s not the midnight to 3 a.m. time, which for whatever reason is fine. That feels like I’m in college—we stayed up late, we’ll go into the diner. But the 3 a.m. to 6 a.m. time is like the murder zone. Nothing good is happening at that time. It is the time when people get murdered. Waking up is like being ripped from the womb of sleep.”

Between the murderous 3 a.m. feedings and the fatigue-inducing effects of the pandemic we’re all coping with, Kaling has developed a new appreciation for rest. “We’re all in this paradoxical thing, which is that we have more time at home, but our sleep is worse because we’re all dealing with more low-level anxiety,” she says. To cope, she’s cutting stressors out of her life, including partnering with myWalgreens to streamline her wellness experience. “I’m really choosy about who I do partnerships with, but honestly, I couldn’t have found one more uniquely suited to my needs,” she says. “I’m loving the pharmacy chat on the app—it’s been really a godsend for me and it’s been helping me mind my health and the health of my kids and give me more of a focus on wellness in an easy way.”

For more easy ways to focus on wellness, we asked Kaling how she gets a good night’s rest—even when she has to wake up during the murder zone.

The pillows that help me sleep…and work

I am one of those people who has about a million pillows on my bed because I do 95% of my writing from bed. Whether I’m writing a screenplay or writing essays or whatever it is, I don’t want to be leaning on the pillow that I sleep on. So I need there to be all these other big buffer pillows, these oversized, overstuffed pillows that I’m leaning on, that don’t mimic my sleep experience at all. I have a Tempur-Pedic pillows I sleep on and then I have like a silky black pillow that looks like a small black cat when it’s laying on my bed, but it’s actually a pillow by Nurse Jamie that I use for beauty. I bring that with me on planes or when I go to the hospital.

Tempur-Pedic Symphony Pillow

Nurse Jamie Beauty Bear Pillow

$79

Saks Fifth Avenue

The nighttime skincare product I can’t live without

I have two. One is my Clarisonic brush. If I don’t use it, I feel like I can’t get off every little tiny bit of makeup on my skin.

And the other I use religiously at nighttime is the Joanna Vargas rejuvenating serum, which is this super hyper moisturizing serum that goes on underneath moisturizer. I feel like my skin just eats it up the whole night and in the morning. My pores look smaller, I feel like any acne I might’ve had has gone away.

Clarisonic Mia

$109$75

Current Body

Joanna Vargas Rejuvenating Serum

$110$91

Amazon

The pajamas that keep me comfy

I wear a lot of bedhead pajamas. I love their jersey, man. I kinda can’t handle the 100% cotton with no stretch—I need that jersey stretch in my pajamas.

BedHead Pajamas

$140

Nordstrom

The perfect weighted blanket

I’m just getting into weighted blankets. I have one from Bearaby and I really do like it. If it’s too heavy, I feel like I’m dying in my bed so it has to be exactly the right amount of weight.

Bearaby Cotton Napper

$249

Bearaby

What’s currently on my nightstand

A box of tissues. A picture of my dad with my daughter. A bottle of water. A lamp. And a book called The Lowland.

The Lowland

My secret to looking rested after sleeping on a plane

A truly annoying thing about me is that I can sleep instantly on any plane, any train, any car. I just love motion, I think it really helps me sleep. But I was on a plane once and saw a female celebrity that I know wearing this sheet mask—she looked insane and I was like kind of silently judging her, but then when we got off the eight hour flight, she looked like exquisite. I was like, “Are you wearing any makeup?” And she was like, “No, I just did my mask.” And so now I take a Joanna Vargas mask with me.

Twilight Face Mask

$75

Joanna Vargas

The 13 Best Boxed Wines to Sip This Spring

No shade towards the white zinfandel every “cool” mom kept on tap for girls’ nights in the ‘80s, but the best boxed wines of 2021 are giving beverages of yore a run for their money. The boxed wine glow-up is upon us, with sales surging for the convenient, budget-friendly option when bored humans have little to do but work, bake, and pop a bottle (or open a box). With around three liters of liquid in your average make (more than three times most bottles), the alternative vino made sense when lockdowns began—and brands followed suit with innovative takes on the cost-efficient refreshment. 

With drink makers reimagining what we sip and how we sip it (from non-alcoholic spirits to new-age aperitifs), bar carts and fridge doors are taking new shape, and the boxed wine renaissance won’t slow down once the world reopens. Its carbon footprint is supposedly less than that of the bottled variety, and stocking your fridge with a box means less store runs for re-ups. Ahead, the 13 best boxed wines to try now (with reviews to back them)—including the bestselling Franzia red blend, which is famous for a reason: It’s not new to this, it’s true to this.

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Joshua Bassett’s Response to SNL’s ‘Drivers License’ Sketch Was Honestly Hilarious

Still trying to figure out why “Drivers License” is all over your feed? Think about it this way: Remember when Hilary Duff and Lindsay Lohan were feuding over Aaron Carter? That’s kind of what’s going down between Olivia Rodrigo, Joshua Bassett, and Sabrina Carpenter. 

Here’s everything you need to know about the song “Drivers License” and the drama behind the official breakup hit of 2021. 

Who’s involved?

In case those names mentioned above mean nothing to you, Olivia Rodrigo, 17, stars in High School Musical: The Musical: The Series on Disney+ alongside Joshua Bassett, 20. And just like the original High School Musical cast, the onscreen pair was rumored to be dating in real life. They even wrote music together that was used in the show. 

However, more recently Bassett has been “spotted” with Sabrina Carpenter, 21, who first rose to fame on Disney Channel’s Girl Meets World (man, everything is a reboot these days).

What supposedly happened?

Per People, this led fans to believe that Bassett had split with Rodrigo for Carpenter. The timing isn’t super clear here, since people have basically pieced it together and made inferences from what’s posted on Instagram, and no one involved has commented on it. (So let that tell you to take this all with a grain of salt.) Bassett and Carpenter went as Sharkboy and Lavagirl for Halloween, which could be a couple costume in the romantic sense or the friendship sense, but they were definitely “together” in some way.

How is that part of “Drivers License”? 

In the lyrics of the song, Rodrigo sings about getting her license “just like we always talked about,” which fans think is a reference to Bassett, as a resurfaced video indicates he helped her learn to drive. A few lines later Rodrigo references a “blond girl” who is “older” and made her feel insecure, possibly Carpenter. Then again, back in July, Rodrigo posted a video of herself working on the song in which the line references a “brunette.” So the change to “blond” could be totally benign.  

What’s the Taylor Swift connection?

Rodrigo has been a fan of Swift’s for years, and TayTay recently congratulated her on her success after “Drivers License” started breaking serious records and topping the charts. Swift was known to write diaristic songs when she was Rodrigo’s age and even revisited the teenage love triangle theme (albeit a fictional one) on her Folklore album. 

What are people saying?

Oh, anything and everything. It’s become a huge trend on TikTok to explore the various points of view presented in the song, as well as to theorize about the real-life drama that could have inspired it. The good news is that Bassett praised the song on Instagram, and everyone seemed to be on mostly good terms, even if feelings were hurt at some point.

But then Joshua Bassett released his own song…

Bassett released the track “Lie, Lie, Lie” on January 14, following the popularity of “Drivers License.” Fans had particular feelings about him using a car in the artwork for the track, which many felt was a direct reference to Rodrigo’s record-breaking song.

Shirley Raines Is Using the Power of Makeup to Help Homeless Women

Every Saturday, Shirley Raines wakes up and paints her face with the brightest eyeshadows she can find, pops on at least one pair of false lashes, and heads to L.A.’s Skid Row, where she and her non-profit Beauty2TheStreetz take care of the area’s homeless community.

On an average day, Raines and her team serve around 600 people, providing them with food, haircuts, wigs, and goodie bags of beauty products donated by brands or purchased via an Amazon wish list. Before the pandemic she’d also set up shop to color hair and apply makeup, but given safety concerns, that’s currently on-pause. Her services were crucial before Covid-19 hit, but are even more so now, as she provides the community with essential PPE, hand sanitizer, and information on social distancing and virus prevention. 

Despite the potential risks to her own health, 53-year-old Raines continues to serve the community multiple times a week. In addition to the Saturday beauty services, she distributes food out of her car at least two days a week. 

Raines started Beauty2TheStreetz three years ago, after the death of her son left her searching for her purpose in life. She says the first time she volunteered to help people living on the street, her life’s mission became clear. “I saw these broken people, and we locked eyes, and I was like, ‘Oh my God, they’re just like me,’” she tells Glamour. After everyone on the street was complimenting her hair and makeup, something clicked in her mind. 

“I was like, this is just all a mask to hide my trauma and pain. Do you want a mask too? Because I can give you one too,’” she says. After a year of working with another organization, she started Beauty2TheStreetz with the help of her six children. Three years later, she has her official non-profit status and a team of 30 people behind her. 

The power of beauty is something Raines knows intimately. “I got tired of looking in the mirror and seeing a woman who buried a child,” she says, explaining how she discovered her signature Rainbow Brite makeup look. “I wanted to do everything they said I couldn’t do. The colors that they said didn’t look good on Black women’s skin, I wanted to wear all of them at the same time. The hairstyles they said Black women couldn’t wear, I wanted to wear that. The eyelashes they said were too long and obnoxious, I wanted to find those eyelashes.”