It’s Not Really Fall Until You Own a Vest

Whether you opt for an oversized knit à la Kendall Jenner or an XXL down puffer like Gigi Hadid, there are a near-infinite number of ways to style a vest right now too. A roomy printed v-neck is easily paired with wide-leg denim and lug-sole loafers—and looks effortless over a T-shirt or crisp button-down

If you’re thinking less grandpa-chic and more Gossip Girl prep, a casually unbuttoned waistcoat looks sexy in a subversive way (and nails the “old money aesthetic” you’re seeing all over social media). Fleece and down puffer vests continue to be autumnal mainstays that instantly ground your outfit with utilitarian edge. 

It’s a vest world and we’re just living in it, so take note and shop the five best women’s vests below, from printed knit styles to fleece and down options. 

Knit Vests

It’s tempting to break out your heavy knits once the slightest chill hits the air, but the good news is you can still revel in all the fall feels without having to bust out chunky pieces just yet. A knit vest is the perfect finishing touch to almost any fall lewk you put together, and in a solid hue, it can be thrown over anything from graphic mesh tops and tissue turtlenecks to long-sleeve floral midis. No goosebumps on our watch. 

H&M Rib-knit Sweater Vest

Alex Mill Kiah Wool and Cashmere-Blend Vest

$135

Net-a-Porter

Madewell Cropped Sweater Vest

$68

Madewell

Everlane The Cotton–Merino Sweater Vest

$60

Everlane

& Other Stories Strawberry Button Knit Vest

$89

& Other Stories

Cos Open-Side Mohair Vest

Printed Grandpa Vests

Argyle! Crochet! Rainbow! Cool-girls have crowned playful grandpa styles (the “uglier” the better, FYI) as the sweater of the season, and it’s not hard to see why: The prints are cozy, nostalgic, and can take a “basic” outfit formula (think a white button-down plus straight-leg denim) and instantly turn it into an on-trend ensemble that’s perfect for this time of year. Consider this retro knit as the foundation *and* highlight of all your fall ‘fits. 

Samsøe Samsøe Simones Sweater Vest

$240

Nordstrom

Staud Joker Argyle Sweater Vest

$240

Nordstrom

Zara Scalloped Knit Vest

Baum Und Pferdgarten Cicilla Mixed Stitch Crochet Vest

$279

Amazon

The Lobby Check Mate Vest

$235

The Lobby

BDG Jordie Jacquard Sweater Vest

$64

Urban Outfitters

Blazer Vests

The most unexpected vest trend dominating our feeds right now? Blazer vests. Yep, that’s right. Once integral to a three-piece suit, the waistcoat is a new favorite among celebs who are putting a refreshingly modern spin on the silhouette by rocking it solo as a top, sometimes with the last few buttons open for a curtain reveal. Neutrals like camel and beige are a low-key entrance into the style, and look on-point when paired with flowy trousers and retro shades.

& Other Stories Buttoned Vest

$69

& Other Stories

Zara Linen Blend Vest

Mango Buttons Suit Waistcoat

Free People Give Me Good Times Summer Set

$198

Free People

Source Unknown Halter Suit Vest

$82

Source Unknown

Babaton Bradshaw Vest

$110

Aritzia

Fleece Vests

You probably have one (or two, or three) fleece vests hanging in your mudroom that could probably use an upgrade. Pick up a shrunken vest if you’re here purely for ~aesthetics~ or snap up one of Tory Burch or Barbour’s hardworking styles for leisurely autumnal activities, like apple-picking and stomping on crunchy fallen leaves. 

Free People Base Camp Sherpa Vest

$78

Free People

Zara Cropped Fleece Vest

Tory Burch Fleece Zip Vest

$298

Tory Burch

Barbour Fleece Vest

$170

Nordstrom

Girlfriend Collective Scout Fleece Vest

$98

Girlfriend Collective

H&M Faux Shearling Vest

Down Vests

As the more easygoing sibling of the puffer coat, the quilted down vest is perfect for transitioning into 40-degree temps since it can top off short jackets and chunky cardigans—or be worn underneath sweeping coat styles. (Versatility, we love to see it!) These vests in particular keep your core warm thanks to the down or down alternative fill, and look super cozy no matter where you’re headed. 

Canada Goose Freestyle Vest

$450

Net-a-Porter

Mango Quilted Skin Style Gilet

Pangaia FLWRDWN Lite Puffer Vest

$195

Pangaia

Urban Outfitters UO Corrine Puffer Vest

$79

Urban Outfitters

Blank Denim Easy Street Vest

$128

Shopbop

Free People Piper Packable Vest

$108

Free People

Sex and the City Stars Post Heartfelt Tributes to Willie Garson

Sex and the City fans were devastated to learn about the passing of Willie Garson, who played Stanford Blatch on the hit HBO show. The cast is equally as crushed over the news, and many have taken to social media to post heartfelt tributes. 

“So deeply, deeply sad we have lost @WillieGarson,” Cynthia Nixon tweeted. We all loved him and adored working with him. He was endlessly funny on-screen and and in real life. He was a source of light, friendship and show business lore. He was a consummate professional—always.”

KMazur/Getty Images

Kristin Davis posted to Instagram, “I first met Willie in 1995 on the spooky nighttime set of the X-files. He immediately made me laugh. Little did I know that we would have the joy of sharing Sex and the City + And Just Like That together. Willie is beloved by our entire community. He was smarter and funnier than you ever would have imagined. We are bereft without him.
But I really want to pay tribute to his fearless commitment to single fatherhood. We spoke about being single parents through adoption often. And nothing gave him more joy and pride than his son Nathen. Nathen’s strength and wisdom beyond his years are evident in his beautiful tribute to his dad. The outpouring of love is earned dear Willie. I am thankful for all of the time we had and grateful that so much of your bright light is on film forever. Maybe we can do our pod cast the next time around ? We love you forever xoxo.” 

Todd Williamson/Getty Images

“Such sad news and a terribly sad loss to the SATC family,” Kim Cattrall tweeted. “Our condolences and RIP dear Willie xo.”

Chris Noth posted a photo of Garson and Sarah Jessica Parker, captioned simply “Willie.” 

Willie Garson is expected to appear in the HBO Max Sex and the City reboot, And Just Like That

Nicole Richie Literally Set Herself on Fire Blowing Out Birthday Candles

In Nicole Richie’s own words, “Well… so far 40 is 🔥.” 

Yes, Nicole Richie—fashion mogul, reality TV legend, one of the funniest people alive—turned 40 on September 21. (Where is the time going? I hate it.) And in celebration, she did what most people do: blow out candles on a birthday cake. Sounds harmless, right?

Well, not when a bit of your hair accidentally touches a candle, and you set yourself on fire. That’s quite literally what happened to Richie, and there’s video proof. 

Watch it for yourself, below. 

The caption proves Richie has a sense of humor about the whole thing, but this is honestly my worst fear come to life. I hate fire. I barely use my stove because of this (and also, I can’t cook). So in my eyes, Richie is a hero for enduring this with a smile. 

I mean, Richie does have a lot to be smiling about these days. She’s been married to rocker Joel Madden since 2010, and they have two kids: Harlow and Sparrow. Richie’s also a judge on the Amazon Prime Video reality show Making the Cut, not to mention founder of the lifestyle brand House of Harlow. She’s killing it. 

On the topic of motherhood, Richie told People, “I had two friends that were moms before me—I had kids very young. It was really so refreshing to see two women that have such different taste and parenting styles maintain a friendship and not judge each other for the way that they bring up their kids. That’s something that’s always stuck with me because there’s not one way to raise children. There’s no one right way to be a mother. It depends on your house and lifestyle. The biggest lesson I’ve learned is not to judge!” That’s some very good advice.

Sex and the City Star Willie Garson Has Passed Away at 57 Years Old

Willie Garson, best known for playing Carrie Bradshaw’s best friend Stanford Blatch on Sex and the City, has passed away at 57 years old. 

People reports Garson died of a “short illness” but was surrounded by family at the time of his passing. A cause of death has not been confirmed, but per TMZ, Garson had reportedly been battling cancer. 

News of Garson’s death first broke when actor Titus Welliver tweeted, “There are no words. I love you dear brother. We are fewer.” Actor Rob Morrow also wrote a post: “Our sweet pal #WillieGarson has passed on. Dear soul, rest easy.” 

Garson’s son, Nathen, posted a moving tribute on Instagram. “I love you so much papa,” he said. “Rest In Peace and I’m so glad you got to share all your adventures with me and were able to accomplish so much. I’m so proud of you. I will always love you, but I think it’s time for you to go on an adventure of your own. You’ll always be with me. Love you more than you will ever know and I’m glad you can be at peace now. You always were the toughest and funniest and smartest person I’ve known. I’m glad you shared you’re love with me. I’ll never forget it or lose it.” 

His post has been flooded with comments from friends sending their condolences, including Glee star Kevin McHale, who wrote, “I’m so so sorry Nathen. How lucky you two were to have had each other. Seeing how he loved you was one the greatest things to witness.”

Actor Caroline Rhea said, “Im so sorry for your loss. The last time I saw your Dad we talked about how lucky we were to be parents and how much we loved our kids.” And in her own post she wrote, “You were so funny and sharp. You made me laugh very hard so many times. You were a great Dad Gone way too young.”

Stanford was one of Carrie’s main confidantes on Sex and the City—a clever, kind, and always-loyal friend whom she loved dearly. In the second SATC movie, Carrie was in Stanford’s larger-than-life wedding to Anthony Marantino.  Stanford’s presence on the show was vibrant, vital, and a perfect complement to the four main women.

Garson is expected to appear in the Sex and the City reboot for HBO Max, out later this year

With Steamers Like These, Laundry Day Will Never Look the Same

If you’ve ever found yourself frantically smoothing out a wrinkled dress, shirt, or pants with no time to change, consider it your cue to invest in one of the best clothes steamers money can buy. For the uninitiated, steamers can a style game-changer: They play nice with different fabrics (a.k.a. you won’t singe your linen pants), can outperform irons (thanks to their larger water tanks), can de-wrinkle upholstery, and even have the power to zap bacteria with the heat.

And, if you don’t have room for an ironing board in your space, the right models can fit everywhere from your closet to your suitcase. (If you need more convincing, they can ~also~ help you save big on your dry-cleaning bill.)

These days, it’s easier than ever to find a good one: Retailers are stocking the shelves with more options than ever, such as travel garment steamers to handle your vacation dresses, models with longer cords for easy movement, and standing steamers for bulkier items that require a little more TLC. Here, nine of the best clothes steamers for keeping your clothes fresh. 

All products featured on Glamour are independently selected by our editors. However, when you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Melissa McCarthy Says Meghan Markle’s Face Lit Up When Prince Harry Walked in the Room

Well, this is so sweet. According to Melissa McCarthy, who would never lie to us, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are just as in love as they seem. McCarthy, who collaborated with the Duchess of Sussex on her “40 X 40” birthday video, says that while filming, she noticed a certain undeniable glow from the Suits actor whenever her husband was near.

McCarthy revealed on the British show Lorraine on September 21 that while (remotely) filming the video with Markle, McCarthy “could tell [when Harry] walked in because we were talking and then she went, ‘Oh hi!’ and her whole face lit up, and I was like, ‘Did Prince Harry just walk in the room?’”

She called the couple “so cute” together and said her impression of the pair’s interaction was that it was “so sweet and genuine.” Melissa should know! She and her husband Ben Falcone have been married for over 15 years and often collaborate on feature films, not just viral videos. Not that it’s a competition or anything.

In the video, released August 4th on the occasion of Markle’s 40th birthday, her royal spouse is seen but not heard, making a cameo appearance juggling outside Meg’s office window. McCarthy added that this funny moment was Prince Harry’s idea, sharing that she was immediately on board. “I was like, ‘Are you weird and funny to boot?’ she said. ”At that point, I was like, ‘That’s great!’ … I love anyone that will do something weird just for weird’s sake, so I was like, ‘I tip my hat!'” Prince Harry and Melissa McCarthy: two comedic legends finally joining forces.

“I just find them very inspiring,” McCarthy has previously said of Markle and Prince Harry. “They’re carving out their own lives. They’re carving out their lives for their kids.” Calling the Sussexes “so sweet and funny,” McCarthy added, “The Suits reunion really made me laugh…That was not my idea. I wish I could claim that bit, but it was hers.” So, three comedic geniuses.

Melissa McCarthy Says Meghan Markle’s Face Lit Up When Prince Harry Walked Into the Room

Well, this is so sweet. According to Melissa McCarthy, who would never lie to us, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are just as in love as they seem. McCarthy, who collaborated with the duchess of Sussex on her “40 X 40” birthday video, says that while filming, she noticed a certain undeniable glow from the Suits actor whenever her husband was near.

McCarthy revealed on the British show Lorraine on September 21 that while (remotely) filming the video with Markle, McCarthy “could tell [when Harry] walked in because we were talking and then she went, ‘Oh hi!’ and her whole face lit up, and I was like, ‘Did Prince Harry just walk in the room?’”

She called the couple “so cute” together and said her impression of the pair’s interaction was that it was “so sweet and genuine.” Melissa should know! She and her husband, Ben Falcone, have been married for over 15 years and often collaborate on feature films, not just viral videos. Not that it’s a competition or anything.

In the video, released August 4 on the occasion of Markle’s 40th birthday, her royal spouse is seen but not heard, making a cameo appearance juggling outside Meg’s office window. McCarthy added that this funny moment was Prince Harry’s idea, sharing that she was immediately on board. “I was like, ‘Are you weird and funny to boot?’” she said. “At that point, I was like, ‘That’s great!’…. I love anyone that will do something weird just for weird’s sake, so I was like, ‘I tip my hat!’” Prince Harry and Melissa McCarthy: two comedic legends finally joining forces.

“I just find them very inspiring,” McCarthy has previously said of Markle and Prince Harry. “They’re carving out their own lives. They’re carving out their lives for their kids.” Calling the Sussexes “so sweet and funny,” McCarthy added, “The Suits reunion really made me laugh…. That was not my idea. I wish I could claim that bit, but it was hers.” So, three comedic geniuses.

TikTok-ers Helped Find Gabby Petito. If She Had Been BIPOC, Would She Still Be Missing?

“Not to sound disrespectful, but I can’t wait for the Netflix series,” a commenter wrote on a TikTok video that analyzed Gabby Petito’s Instagram for clues about her disappearance. Petito’s story has captivated America: Attractive 22-year-old travel blogger goes missing, her fiancé refuses to talk, he goes missing too, investigators find what they believe is her body in a national park.

It’s a nightmare. And while most of us have been following along from a respectable distance, a subset of women on TikTok have decided to treat it like an interactive whodunit. “This is like watching true crime on Netflix, but in real time,” a commenter wrote on a video discussing Instagram posts by Brian Laundrie, Petito’s fiancé.

On TikTok, #GabbyPetito has more than 500 million views. Countless people have flocked to Petito’s and her fiancé Brian Laundrie’s Instagrams to search for clues and leave long, ardent comments. Accounts that have turned themselves into Petito content mills have exponentially grown in followers. These at-home investigations bring together the aesthetics of Nancy Drew, memes, and pastel educational infographics. “Not to go all Elle Woods but Gabby Petito doesn’t have her roots done on ig pics of the parks but her has fresh blonde in the most recent pic aka it’s an old picture,” a woman tweeted, garnering tens of thousands of reactions.

It’s tempting to pronounce this insensitive, or say that it undermines the serious investigation of Petito’s and Laundrie’s disappearances. But social media’s penetration into our lives can rarely be so neatly simplified. Some of these content creators are monetizing a tragedy, but the reality is that some of them were instrumental in finding the body and narrowing the search for Laundrie.

The New York Times reports that a YouTuber couple, Kyle and Jenn Bethune, realized they had been traveling and making content in Bridger-Teton National Forest around the same time as Petito and Laundrie. Jenn found shots of Petito’s van in their YouTube footage and reported it to the FBI. The couple also uploaded the video about finding the van to YouTube. And through that video’s popularity, Bethune connected with Petito’s mother—the Bethunes had also lost a child, and the two cried together, Kyle Bethune told the Times. On Sunday investigators found what they believe is Petito’s body near the place where the Bethune’s video had located the van.

Another crack in the case: A woman named Miranda Baker saw Laundrie’s image on TikTok and realized that she and her boyfriend had picked him up hitchhiking after Petito’s disappearance. She contacted the authorities, and shared her own story on TikTok. The line between entertainment and evidence has never been less clear. Giving the morass of social media content about Petito a quick scan, most of it seems to come from a place of compassion, not just morbid curiosity. “Anyone else cry even tho they didn’t know her? I’m so sad,” one popular comment reads, on a TikTok announcing the news that Petito’s body had been found. Many of the responses are just prayers.

But what is it about Gabby Petito that’s captured the public imagination in a way that hasn’t been matched by interest in, say, Dulce Maria Alavez, a five-year-old who went missing this time two years ago while playing in a park in New Jersey? Or Mary Johnson, a 31-year-old woman who was reported missing last December on the Tulalip Reservation in Washington State? It’s what journalist Gwen Ifill called “missing white woman syndrome.” That’s the phrase she coined to describe the crazed public attention on cases like those of Natalee Holloway or Elizabeth Smart, and utter indifference to nonwhite girls and women who disappear.

It’s not that crazy that we’re invested in a tragic, highly visible news story. But the frenzied focus on Petito—when hundreds of thousands of missing person reports are filed in the United States every year, and around 17,000 remain unresolved—is startling. It reveals a horrifying paradigm when it comes to the way the public processes violence against women. When white women die under mysterious circumstances—think JonBenét Ramsey, Kitty Genovese, Sharon Tate—they are turned, gruesomely, into entertainment. But when women of color, especially Black, trans, and indigenous women die or are killed, their stories are largely ignored.

Tiktokers Helped Find Gabby Petito. If She Was a BIPOC, Would She Still Be Missing?

“Not to sound disrespectful, but I can’t wait for the Netflix series,” a commenter wrote on a TikTok video analyzing Gabby Petito’s Instagram for clues about her disappearance. Petito’s story has captivated America: attractive 22-year-old travel blogger goes missing, her fiancé refuses to talk, he goes missing too, investigators find what they believe is her body in a national park.

It’s a nightmare. And while most of us have been following along from a respectable distance, a subset of women on TikTok have decided to treat it like an interactive whodunit. “This is like watching true crime on Netflix, but in real time,” a commenter wrote on a video analyzing Instagram posts by Brian Laundrie, Petito’s fiancé.

On TikTok, #GabbyPetito has over 500 million views. Countless people have flocked to Petito’s and her fiancé Brian Laundrie’s Instagrams to search for clues and leave long, ardent comments. Accounts that have turned themselves into Petito content mills have exponentially grown in followers. These at-home investigations bring together the aesthetics of Nancy Drew, memes, and pastel educational infographics. “Not to go all Elle Woods but gabby petito doesn’t have her roots done on ig pics of the parks but her has fresh blonde in the most recent pic aka its an old picture,” a woman tweeted, garnering tens of thousands of reactions.

It’s tempting to pronounce this insensitive, or say that it undermines the serious investigation of Petito and Laundries’ disappearances. But social media’s penetration into our lives can rarely be so neatly simplified. Some of these content creators are monetizing a tragedy, but the reality is that some of them were instrumental in finding the body and narrowing the search for Laundrie.

The New York Times reports that a YouTuber couple, Kyle and Jenn Bethune, realized they had been traveling and making content in Bridger-Teton National Forest around the same time as Petito and Laundrie. Jenn found shots of Petito’s van in their YouTube footage and reported it to the FBI. The couple also uploaded the video about finding the van to YouTube. And through that video’s popularity, Bethune connected with Petito’s mother—the Bethunes had also lost a child, and the two cried together, Kyle Bethune told the Times. On Sunday, investigators found what they believe is Petito’s body near the place where the Bethune’s video had located the van.

Another crack in the case: A woman named Miranda Baker saw Laundrie’s image on Tiktok and realized that she and her boyfriend had picked him up hitchhiking after Petito’s disappearance. She contacted the authorities, and shared her own story on Tiktok. The line between entertainment and evidence has never been less clear. Giving the morass of social media content about Petito a quick scan, most of it seems to come from a place of compassion, not just morbid curiosity. “Anyone else cry even tho they didn’t know her? I’m so sad,” one popular comment reads, on a TikTok announcing the news that Petito’s body has been found. Many of the responses are just prayers.

But what is it about Gabby Petito that’s captured the public imagination in a way that hasn’t been matched by interest in, say, Dulce Maria Alavez, a five-year-old who went missing this time two years ago while playing in a park in New Jersey? Or Mary Johnson, a 31-year-old woman who was reported missing last December on the Tulalip Reservation in Washington State? It’s what journalist Gwen Ifill called “missing white woman syndrome.” That’s the phrase she coined to describe the crazed public attention on cases like those of Natalee Holloway or Elizabeth Smart, and utter indifference to non-white girls and women who disappear.

TikTok-ers Helped Find Gabby Petito. If She Had Been a BIPOC, Would She Still Be Missing?

“Not to sound disrespectful, but I can’t wait for the Netflix series,” a commenter wrote on a TikTok video that analyzed Gabby Petito’s Instagram for clues about her disappearance. Petito’s story has captivated America: Attractive 22-year-old travel blogger goes missing, her fiancé refuses to talk, he goes missing too, investigators find what they believe is her body in a national park.

It’s a nightmare. And while most of us have been following along from a respectable distance, a subset of women on TikTok have decided to treat it like an interactive whodunit. “This is like watching true crime on Netflix, but in real time,” a commenter wrote on a video discussing Instagram posts by Brian Laundrie, Petito’s fiancé.

On TikTok, #GabbyPetito has more than 500 million views. Countless people have flocked to Petito’s and her fiancé Brian Laundrie’s Instagrams to search for clues and leave long, ardent comments. Accounts that have turned themselves into Petito content mills have exponentially grown in followers. These at-home investigations bring together the aesthetics of Nancy Drew, memes, and pastel educational infographics. “Not to go all Elle Woods but Gabby Petito doesn’t have her roots done on ig pics of the parks but her has fresh blonde in the most recent pic aka it’s an old picture,” a woman tweeted, garnering tens of thousands of reactions.

It’s tempting to pronounce this insensitive, or say that it undermines the serious investigation of Petito’s and Laundrie’s disappearances. But social media’s penetration into our lives can rarely be so neatly simplified. Some of these content creators are monetizing a tragedy, but the reality is that some of them were instrumental in finding the body and narrowing the search for Laundrie.

The New York Times reports that a YouTuber couple, Kyle and Jenn Bethune, realized they had been traveling and making content in Bridger-Teton National Forest around the same time as Petito and Laundrie. Jenn found shots of Petito’s van in their YouTube footage and reported it to the FBI. The couple also uploaded the video about finding the van to YouTube. And through that video’s popularity, Bethune connected with Petito’s mother—the Bethunes had also lost a child, and the two cried together, Kyle Bethune told the Times. On Sunday investigators found what they believe is Petito’s body near the place where the Bethune’s video had located the van.

Another crack in the case: A woman named Miranda Baker saw Laundrie’s image on TikTok and realized that she and her boyfriend had picked him up hitchhiking after Petito’s disappearance. She contacted the authorities, and shared her own story on TikTok. The line between entertainment and evidence has never been less clear. Giving the morass of social media content about Petito a quick scan, most of it seems to come from a place of compassion, not just morbid curiosity. “Anyone else cry even tho they didn’t know her? I’m so sad,” one popular comment reads, on a TikTok announcing the news that Petito’s body had been found. Many of the responses are just prayers.

But what is it about Gabby Petito that’s captured the public imagination in a way that hasn’t been matched by interest in, say, Dulce Maria Alavez, a five-year-old who went missing this time two years ago while playing in a park in New Jersey? Or Mary Johnson, a 31-year-old woman who was reported missing last December on the Tulalip Reservation in Washington State? It’s what journalist Gwen Ifill called “missing white woman syndrome.” That’s the phrase she coined to describe the crazed public attention on cases like those of Natalee Holloway or Elizabeth Smart, and utter indifference to nonwhite girls and women who disappear.

It’s not that crazy that we’re invested in a tragic, highly visible news story. But the frenzied focus on Petito—when hundreds of thousands of missing person reports are filed in the United States every year, and around 17,000 remain unresolved—is startling. It reveals a horrifying paradigm when it comes to the way the public processes violence against women. When white women die under mysterious circumstances—think JonBenét Ramsey, Kitty Genovese, Sharon Tate—they are turned, gruesomely, into entertainment. But when women of color, especially Black, trans, and indigenous women die or are killed, their stories are largely ignored.