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Getting Cozy with Coco: Touring the Private Homes of Fashion Icons

BEHIND EVERY GREAT fashion house, there’s a more modest house, intimate spaces where the hardest-working talents in the fashion world ate, bathed and unwound. Many of these abodes—either childhood homes where inspiration first struck or manses fabulously furnished during the height of success—are open to the public, whether as museums, hotels or gardens. Here, four places, from Marrakech to Miami, well worth snooping around.

Christian Dior

Musee Christian Dior

Granville, France

Christian Dior’s cotton-candy-pink childhood home sits on a seaside cliff top in Normandy. “Our house at Granville, like all Anglo-Norman buildings at the end of the last century, was perfectly hideous,” he remembered in “Dior by Dior,” his autobiography. “All the same I look back on it with tenderness as well as amazement. In a certain sense, my whole way of life was influenced by its architecture and environment.” Opened to the public as Musée Christian Dior in 1997, the house currently welcomes visitors to the exhibition “Treasures of the Collection: 30 Years of Acquisitions,” on display until January 6. musee-dior-granville.com. The Château de la Colle Noire in the Grasse region, which Dior bought and restored in the last years of his life, will open to visitors for a few days in October. lvmh.com/lesjourneesparticulieres

Coco Chanel

La Pausa

Dallas Museum of Art, Texas

Coco Chanel used the apartment above her Paris boutique for entertaining and lived in a suite at the nearby Ritz hotel. Chanel’s spiritual home, however, was La Pausa, the French Riviera villa she built in 1928. The building is not open to the public, but parts of the interior have been recreated in the Dallas Museum of Art, using many of the original furnishings. In contrast to Chanel’s exuberantly mirrored and lacquered Paris digs, the villa had a stark, almost monastic look reminiscent of the cloistered convent orphanage where she was raised, complete with heavy doors, iron grids, vaulting and austere wooden furnishings. dma.org

Gianni Versace

The Villa Casa Casuarina

Miami, Florida

For the last five years of his life, Gianni Versace lived in this 19,000-square-foot South Beach mansion that dates from 1930; he was shot and killed on its doorstep in 1997. His over-the-top aesthetic lives on inside—and how. Mythological frescoes, statues and fountains festoon the house, now an intimate hotel. Versace’s Medusa logo is as ubiquitous as Disneyland’s Hidden Mickeys; the largest version, a mosaic patio beside the gold-tiled pool, was created in Versace’s Italian hometown of Reggio Calabria, broken apart, then reassembled in Miami. vmmiamibeach.com

Yves Saint Laurent

Villa Oasis

Marrakech, Morocco

In 1980, Yves Saint Laurent bought and restored a botanical garden and the adjacent Villa Oasis in Marrakech (the former estate of French painter Jacques Majorelle). He lived there with his partner, Pierre Bergé, until his death in 2010. “Before Marrakech, everything was black,” Saint Laurent once said. “This city taught me color, and I embraced its light, its insolent mixes and ardent inventions.” Today, the Jardin Majorelle is Morocco’s most popular tourist attraction, though it faces competition from the Musée Yves Saint Laurent, opened in 2017. Private tours of the villa can be booked through the Four Seasons Marrakech with a donation to the Foundation Jardin Majorelle. fourseasons.com

More in Off Duty Travel

Twitter Is Divided About Netflix’s *Insatiable* Getting Renewed for a Second Season

The show is really living up to its name, isn’t it? Netflix has renewed its divisive comedy series Insatiable for a second season, according to a press release.

The series, which stars former Disney Channel star Debby Ryan in the leading role, follows a plus-size, unpopular high schooler nicknamed “Fatty Patty” who loses a significant amount of weight over a summer (from having her jaw wired shut), and when she returns for the new school year, seeks revenge on everyone who’s ever been mean to her. Upon its release, Insatiable generated a significant amount of controversy, with many viewers accusing it of fat-shaming. The use of a fatsuit in flashback scenes was also widely contested.

Despite the backlash the show received, Ryan believed the show succeeded in what it set out to do, and that the fatsuit was an integral part of developing Patty’s identity. “There was a point where [the showrunner] and I are like, ‘If at any point this is funny, if at any point people laugh, we’re not doing it.’ We’re not doing the show that we’re trying to do. We’re just trying to portray an origin story. We’re trying to showcase that,” Ryan old Teen Vogue last month. “We knew that this conversation needed to be had. We knew that this societal brokenness needed to be addressed, but we didn’t know how badly it needed to be addressed. My friend, a few days before the trailer hit, in reference to something else, said, ‘The size of the reaction is the size of the wound,’ and it stayed with me.”

Unsurprisingly, the social media reaction has been just as divisive for the show’s renewal. Below, see the split reactions.

The new season is set to debut in 2019.

Related Stories:

120,000 People Have Signed a Petition to Cancel Netflix’s Insatiable for “Fat Shaming”

How Like Father Became Netflix’s Unexpected Hit of the Summer

Netflix Is Publishing Anonymous Love Letters From Fans of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before

All the Curve Models Who Walked the Spring 2019 Shows at New York Fashion Week 2018

In September 2017, it felt as if size-inclusivity had reached an all-time high at Fashion Week: By Glamour‘s count, there were over 200 non-straight-sized models featured on the runway or at presentations for Spring 2018, largely thanks to brands that cater to plus-sized shoppers (like Addition Elle, Torrid, and Dia & Co.) appearing on the calendar. Still, it was increase from the 27 models spotted during the previous season. Though encouraging, by the Fall 2018 shows, that count went down to 30 across Fashion Weeks in New York, London, Milan, and Paris according to The Fashion Spot, which keeps track of diversity in casting across runways. That’s 1.2 percent.

With the Spring 2019 shows well underway, we’re keeping tabs of body diversity on the runway during New York Fashion Week. (Though, as some designers move away from traditional runway casting in favor of “real people,” we’re counting professional models in our final tally.) A familiar list of designers, led by Chromat and Christian Siriano, presented their new collections on women of all sizes; and they were joined by a handful of brands new to curve casting, including Mara Hoffman, Sies Marjan, and Cushnie.

Despite fewer appearances on the whole than previous seasons, we’re applauding the designers that have sent models of diverse sizes down their Spring 2019 runways. Ahead, see every appearance by a curve model at New York Fashion Week 2018.

We bring you the trends. You make them your own. Sign up for our daily newsletter to find the best fashion for YOU.

Ronna Romney McDaniel Could Help Republicans Win in November

Ronna Romney McDaniel loves the phrase “You don’t get what you don’t ask for.”

It became a mantra after a seminal moment early in her career. At 24 she was already the head of her department at a political advertising firm, which was hiring a young man fresh out of college. He’d report to her, she learned, but he’d also make as much money as she did. She was nervous to confront the boss about the lopsided deal (“I didn’t know how to negotiate, and I didn’t know how to advocate for myself,” she says), but plunged ahead anyway. “I cried when I did it,” she admits. “I wouldn’t recommend that.

Nonetheless, she walked away with a $10,000 raise—and a priceless lesson about sticking up for herself.

Today, McDaniel, 45, is supremely confident about asking for what she wants: Since January 2017, when she became the chair of the Republican National Committee, she has helped the party haul in well over $210 million, more than any previous RNC chair during a midterm election cycle. The Michigan-based mom of two has traveled more than 150,000 miles, visiting over half the states. But there’s no time to rest: Republicans are fighting to keep their hold on Congress in a November vote that is widely seen as a referendum on President Donald Trump.

It’s easy to imagine McDaniel as one of those candidates in the arena. She’s deft at delivering GOP talking points (and talking up Trump) and unafraid to jab at Democrats (or the press), and she has the political pedigree (Mitt Romney is her uncle, and both her parents and two grandparents have run for office). But the ugliness of her mom’s 1994 U.S. Senate bid in Michigan doused any interest she might have had in making her own run. Instead she now puts her strategic chops to use behind the scenes for the GOP.

In a sit-down with Glamour, McDaniel talked about bringing more women into the Republican Party under a president who hasn’t (to put it lightly) always been well-spoken in regard to women and about whether we might see another Romney run for office.

Here are the highlights:

Glamour: You come from a political family, you were head of the Michigan GOP, but you’ve also been a full-time mom. How did you get here?

Ronna Romney McDaniel: I was on my PTA; I was room mom …. I was stay-home mom. [Then] we had a budget crisis in our state. One of the favorite teachers in our school got laid off. They couldn’t tell him if he was going to get his job back because the budget hadn’t been passed yet. You realize how things that are happening on your state level, your local level, affect your life…. I didn’t expect it would end here, but it’s an honor and a thrill.

Glamour: And now you’ve raised millions of dollars for the GOP. What drives you?

RM: A lot of it is doing my homework, [explaining why] it’s a good investment—and then not taking no for an answer…. People will blow you up. They’ll be like, “I’m not giving. I’m so mad at the party.” [You have to] listen. Take it in. Have a dialogue, and then say, “OK, let me tell you why you need to invest.”

Glamour: What is it like to work with President Trump? Some say he’s remaking the party, and others think he’s destroying it.

RM: I get along great with him. He and I have a very honest relationship; we have a great rapport…. I see him as a change agent [who] tapped into I think what a lot of people felt like was a frustration with Washington. So that’s where Trump transcended party. He was a deal maker, he’s a businessman…. He’s reached his hand out to Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, trying to work across party lines.

Glamour: When he’s not calling them names on Twitter.

RM: Yes, I know—and then the next day he invites them over. That’s how he is.

Selfie time with Ronna Romney McDaniel and Indiana republican women after a breakfast conversation with the state chairman at the Indiana GOP convention.

PHOTO: Jonno Rattman

McDaniel poses with a group of women at the Indiana Republican State Convention

Ronna Romney McDaniel during an interview with regional TV affiliate stations after delivering the keynote address of the Indiana GOP convention.

PHOTO: Jonno Rattman

McDaniel preps for an interview with local television stations in Indiana

Glamour: Do President Trump’s comments about women complicate your job? Even with you running the RNC, people still sometimes say the GOP is a party of “old white dudes.”

RM: There are certain voters who that’s an issue with, but if you go to Main Street, Iowa, or Indiana, or Missouri, where a lot of our battleground races are, most of the voters are thinking about their lives…. I think being a woman has actually helped me with fundraising. I was in Colorado [and] this one guy’s like, “I just think you’re cool, so I’m going to support you because I love that you’re a woman and I have a daughter your [age].” And [I’m] like, “I’ll take it. I’m a lot cooler than you think. Let’s write a bigger check.”

Glamour: President Trump has had some very public fights with your uncle Mitt Romney. It’s been reported that the President wanted you to drop “Romney” from your name. [The chairwoman’s Twitter page identifies her only as “Ronna McDaniel.”]

RM: It’s a ridiculous story. There is no person in the world, not even the President of the United States, who could say, “Change your name.” I want to make sure that the McDaniel doesn’t get left out, because the three people who are supporting me the most have that last name—and when your middle name’s Romney, sometimes people forget the McDaniel, and that’s just not good.

Glamour: The three people are your husband, son, and daughter. How is your job affecting your family?

RM: You have to have a spouse who supports you. I don’t care if you’re male or female. But the amount of hours I’m on the road and being away from the family—[he’s] pretty much a single dad four days a week. My husband works, [so it’s about] balancing raising our kids and doing it well. There are days where it’s a tough day for my kids and I’m not home, and it’s awful. We’re making it work. I actually cooked a dinner on Sunday and it wasn’t terrible. So that’s a huge success in my life.

Glamour: Did you grow up loving politics?

RM: I hated politics. In a political family, you don’t realize what you’re learning through osmosis [at the] dinner table…. It gets heated and people are fighting, and you’re like, “What is wrong with my family? Can’t we just talk about normal, nice things?” My mom’s Senate race [was] brutal, and I just really soured on politics after that. I just didn’t like the negativity, and most of it was from our own party.

Glamour: What if one day your daughter said, “Mom, I’m running for president”?

RM: I’d be so proud of her. [It’s] hard to run for office. A lot of people don’t want to subject themselves to the scrutiny, [but] we’re only going to get the level of service that we deserve if good people step up and run. And I think my daughter would be a great president.

In a pivotal election year, Glamour is keeping track of the historic number of women running (and voting) in the midterm elections. For more on our latest midterm coverage, visit www.glamour.com/midterms.


Celeste Katz is senior politics reporter for Glamour. Send news tips, questions, and comments to celeste_katz@condenast.com.

MORE: Florida’s Wait for a Woman Governor Continues, but Diversity Still Wins

Ronna Romney McDaniel Could Help the Republicans Win in November

Ronna Romney McDaniel loves the phrase “You don’t get what you don’t ask for.”

It became a mantra after a seminal moment early in her career. At 24 she was already the head of her department at a political advertising firm, which was hiring a young man fresh out of college. He’d report to her, she learned, but he’d also make as much money as she did. She was nervous to confront the boss about the lopsided deal (“I didn’t know how to negotiate, and I didn’t know how to advocate for myself,” she says), but plunged ahead anyway. “I cried when I did it,” she admits. “I wouldn’t recommend that.

Nonetheless, she walked away with a $10,000 raise—and a priceless lesson about sticking up for herself.

Today, McDaniel, 45, is supremely confident about asking for what she wants: Since January 2017, when she became the chair of the Republican National Committee, she has helped the party haul in well over $210 million, more than any previous RNC chair during a midterm election cycle. The Michigan-based mom of two has traveled more than 150,000 miles, visiting over half the states. But there’s no time to rest: Republicans are fighting to keep their hold on Congress in a November vote that is widely seen as a referendum on President Donald Trump.

It’s easy to imagine McDaniel as one of those candidates in the arena. She’s deft at delivering GOP talking points (and talking up Trump) and unafraid to jab at Democrats (or the press), and she has the political pedigree (Mitt Romney is her uncle, and both her parents and two grandparents have run for office). But the ugliness of her mom’s 1994 U.S. Senate bid in Michigan doused any interest she might have had in making her own run. Instead she now puts her strategic chops to use behind the scenes for the GOP.

In a sit-down with Glamour, McDaniel talked about bringing more women into the Republican Party under a president who hasn’t (to put it lightly) always been well-spoken in regard to women and about whether we might see another Romney run for office.

Here are the highlights:

Glamour: You come from a political family, you were head of the Michigan GOP, but you’ve also been a full-time mom. How did you get here?

Ronna Romney McDaniel: I was on my PTA; I was room mom …. I was stay-home mom. [Then] we had a budget crisis in our state. One of the favorite teachers in our school got laid off. They couldn’t tell him if he was going to get his job back because the budget hadn’t been passed yet. You realize how things that are happening on your state level, your local level, affect your life…. I didn’t expect it would end here, but it’s an honor and a thrill.

Glamour: And now you’ve raised millions of dollars for the GOP. What drives you?

RM: A lot of it is doing my homework, [explaining why] it’s a good investment—and then not taking no for an answer…. People will blow you up. They’ll be like, “I’m not giving. I’m so mad at the party.” [You have to] listen. Take it in. Have a dialogue, and then say, “OK, let me tell you why you need to invest.”

Glamour: What is it like to work with President Trump? Some say he’s remaking the party, and others think he’s destroying it.

RM: I get along great with him. He and I have a very honest relationship; we have a great rapport…. I see him as a change agent [who] tapped into I think what a lot of people felt like was a frustration with Washington. So that’s where Trump transcended party. He was a deal maker, he’s a businessman…. He’s reached his hand out to Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi, trying to work across party lines.

Glamour: When he’s not calling them names on Twitter.

RM: Yes, I know—and then the next day he invites them over. That’s how he is.

Selfie time with Ronna Romney McDaniel and Indiana republican women after a breakfast conversation with the state chairman at the Indiana GOP convention.

PHOTO: Jonno Rattman

McDaniel poses with a group of women at the Indiana Republican State Convention

Ronna Romney McDaniel during an interview with regional TV affiliate stations after delivering the keynote address of the Indiana GOP convention.

PHOTO: Jonno Rattman

McDaniel preps for an interview with local television stations in Indiana

Glamour: Do President Trump’s comments about women complicate your job? Even with you running the RNC, people still sometimes say the GOP is a party of “old white dudes.”

RM: There are certain voters who that’s an issue with, but if you go to Main Street, Iowa, or Indiana, or Missouri, where a lot of our battleground races are, most of the voters are thinking about their lives…. I think being a woman has actually helped me with fundraising. I was in Colorado [and] this one guy’s like, “I just think you’re cool, so I’m going to support you because I love that you’re a woman and I have a daughter your [age].” And [I’m] like, “I’ll take it. I’m a lot cooler than you think. Let’s write a bigger check.”

Glamour: President Trump has had some very public fights with your uncle Mitt Romney. It’s been reported that the President wanted you to drop “Romney” from your name. [The chairwoman’s Twitter page identifies her only as “Ronna McDaniel.”]

RM: It’s a ridiculous story. There is no person in the world, not even the President of the United States, who could say, “Change your name.” I want to make sure that the McDaniel doesn’t get left out, because the three people who are supporting me the most have that last name—and when your middle name’s Romney, sometimes people forget the McDaniel, and that’s just not good.

Glamour: The three people are your husband, son, and daughter. How is your job affecting your family?

RM: You have to have a spouse who supports you. I don’t care if you’re male or female. But the amount of hours I’m on the road and being away from the family—[he’s] pretty much a single dad four days a week. My husband works, [so it’s about] balancing raising our kids and doing it well. There are days where it’s a tough day for my kids and I’m not home, and it’s awful. We’re making it work. I actually cooked a dinner on Sunday and it wasn’t terrible. So that’s a huge success in my life.

Glamour: Did you grow up loving politics?

RM: I hated politics. In a political family, you don’t realize what you’re learning through osmosis [at the] dinner table…. It gets heated and people are fighting, and you’re like, “What is wrong with my family? Can’t we just talk about normal, nice things?” My mom’s Senate race [was] brutal, and I just really soured on politics after that. I just didn’t like the negativity, and most of it was from our own party.

Glamour: What if one day your daughter said, “Mom, I’m running for president”?

RM: I’d be so proud of her. [It’s] hard to run for office. A lot of people don’t want to subject themselves to the scrutiny, [but] we’re only going to get the level of service that we deserve if good people step up and run. And I think my daughter would be a great president.

In a pivotal election year, Glamour is keeping track of the historic number of women running (and voting) in the midterm elections. For more on our latest midterm coverage, visit www.glamour.com/midterms.


Celeste Katz is senior politics reporter for Glamour. Send news tips, questions, and comments to celeste_katz@condenast.com.

MORE: Florida’s Wait for a Woman Governor Continues, but Diversity Still Wins

The First Review: Hulu’s New Astronaut Drama Engages But Doesn’t Make It Out Of Orbit

Streaming TV is the place to be for some of the most ambitious series on the small screen, and Hulu shoots for the stars with The First. The drama stars Sean Penn and a Designated Survivor star as a group of astronauts works to launch the first manned mission to Mars. The First is engaging with a launch that provides a stellar hook to tune in for the rest of the series, but it never quite makes it out of orbit.

The First stars Sean Penn as veteran astronaut and commander Tom Hagerty, who is an ideal candidate to lead a mission to Mars but is held back by his attachments to his troubled daughter Denise (Anna Jacoby-Heron) and his deceased wife Diane (Melissa George). After a first attempt to reach the red planet doesn’t go as planned, aerospace magnate Laz Ingram recruits Tom to keep the mission going. Tom must work with a co-commander by the name of Kayla Price (LisaGay Hamilton), and she has her doubts about why she must share her position with Tom. Working with a crew of talented other prospective travelers to Mars, the series follows the ups and downs of politics, policy, and humanity as everybody must consider how much the mission is really worth to them.

First things first: in case you’re planning on tuning in because you expect to see lots of rockets blasting off as is somewhat hinted in the trailer, you may want to rethink the series. The First isn’t about rockets blasting off. Rather, it’s an examination of humanity and the personal relationships of the people tasked with accomplishing what was once impossible. Despite revolving around a mission to travel to Mars, The First is not just another sci-fi series. You won’t see aliens or tech from other worlds or even anything too far out of the realm of possibility, although some of the advanced technology would certainly be helpful in real life.

If, however, you’re considering tuning in not because you’re craving some sci-fi but rather because you’re looking for some human drama, The First is a worthy watch. The First manages to make a group of extraordinary people relatable enough that you can feel their triumphs as well as their failures, and it excels in setting the tone. The series features a tragedy fairly early on that needed to hit home if viewers were going to care about the aftermath and the characters picking up the pieces. On that front, The First succeeds. The narrative simply meanders from its trajectory, which started out as the mission to take a group of people from Earth to Mars and back. The show makes it off the ground and into space; it simply doesn’t blast off beyond expectations.

Although it’s certainly unlike anything else on TV, The First is also not a show that’s especially revolutionary. The First is a perfectly adequate way to pass the time. Even though you may not be on the edge of your seat from start to finish, you can likely enjoy the ride for what it is.

The cast is certainly solid enough. Sean Penn is unsurprisingly intense in some of his scenes, and his ability to switch between calm and controlled to intense and impassioned adds depth to his character. The relationship between Tom and his daughter wouldn’t work if both actors couldn’t turn in the same kind of nuanced performances, and Anna Jacoby-Heron holds her own opposite the experienced Penn. Natascha McElhone is perfectly cast as the cool and collected magnate who shows depth to anybody who looks hard enough for long enough, and Designated Survivor fans who are still upset that she left the series in that heartbreaking way (especially since Designated Survivor was recently rescued from cancellation by Netflix) can at least be assured that The First is an ideal starring vehicle for her as leading lady. The humanity that the show really needed to keep viewers interested comes courtesy of the performers.

Unlike other Hulu series like The Handmaid’s Tale and Castle Rock (which recently aired its mind-bending season finale), all eight episodes of The First will be available streaming at once. You can begin The First on Friday, September 14 on Hulu. There also are plenty of other great shows coming to Hulu as well as broadcast TV this fall.

Norm Macdonald Talks Netflix’s Response To His Controversial Comments

Norm Macdonald is only days away from debuting his brand new Netflix talk show, but the buzz he’s currently generating has him in some hot water. In a recent interview, Macdonald dropped some controversial comments about the #MeToo movement as well as actors Roseanne Barr and Louis C.K. that resulted in a backlash that got him cancelled from an appearance on The Tonight Show. The big question became how Netflix would react to the controversial comments and whether Norm Macdonald Has a Show would be impacted. Although Netflix hasn’t released an official statement just yet, Macdonald shared the streaming giant’s response, saying this:

According to Norm Macdonald in comments on The Howard Stern Show, Netflix boss Ted Sarandos didn’t tell him how he had to phrase his apology on social media. Rather than choosing how and when Macdonald reached out in the aftermath of his controversial comments, Netflix evidently allowed Macdonald to share his own response in his own words. Given that the uproar was not what the streaming giant probably wanted ahead of Macdonald’s show’s premiere, the leeway regarding his public statement may surprise some.

On the one hand, a statement clearly written by Norm Macdonald himself could have the sort of genuine phrasing that convinces potential viewers that they should tune in to his new series despite how they do or do not feel about the controversial comments. On the other hand, a statement penned by folks at Netflix would cover all the bases the streaming service would want covered. Netflix ultimately went with allowing Macdonald to go with his own message.

Norm Macdonald addressed the comments that struck many as sympathetic to Roseanne Barr and Louis C.K. despite their very public falls from grace via a Twitter post:

Only time will tell if Norm Macdonald’s Twitter apology will win folks on social media over to give his show a shot. The apology itself is diplomatic and not nearly as controversial as his previous comments. That said, more of what he said in his chat with Howard Stern may result in even more backlash. While he asserted his support for the #MeToo movement to Stern, he went on to state that a person would “have to have Down syndrome” not to feel sorry for the victims who have spoken out as part of the movement.

This is hardly the first time Netflix has faced controversy regarding one of its shows. This summer’s decision to renew 13 Reasons Why after a deeply divisive second season didn’t go over well with everybody, and a huge number of people felt that one of the streaming service’s new shows was fat-shaming. Netflix stood by Insatiable, and Netflix may continue to stand by Norm Macdonald Has a Show, which is set to premiere in Netflix’s lineup on Friday, September 14 at 12:01 a.m. PT.

What Solo: A Star Wars Story Is Actually About, According To Sam Witwer

Unlike Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, which opted to primarily follow brand-new characters, Solo: A Star Wars Story‘s delved into the backstory behind one of this mythology’s most popular characters. That being said, aside from Chewbacca and Lando Calrissian , all of Solo‘s main players were also new additions to a galaxy far, far away, include Emilia Clarke’s Qi’ra. Although she and Han were once lovers, Qi’ra’s time with the Crimson Dawn crime syndicate changed her, and in the end, she left Han so he wouldn’t accompany her on her rise through the underworld. As Sam Witwer, who voiced Darth Maul in Solo, sees it, Qi’ra’s efforts to keep Han uncorrupted is what the movie as a whole is actually about. The actor explained to CinemaBlend:

It doesn’t occur to you the first time, but the second time you see the movie, that movie is really about Qi’ra trying to save Han Solo’s soul, because she knows he’s gonna follow her all the way to hell if he has the chance, so she has to break his heart. She has to keep him away from the darkest elements of the universe. She has to keep him firmly out of hell and ascending, which his trajectory as a character is to ascend, and she knows that. But that ascendant quality that Han Solo has, that good guy quality could be corrupted and used in the opposite direction, because she knows where she’s going and she knows he doesn’t belong there. So if you want to really illustrate that, and you need to keep that criminal, dark side element in the background and keep it mysterious, then yes, it’s a smart move to use something that George Lucas had already established elsewhere and suddenly introduce that in there.

Having taken his first steps as a bonafide outlaw in Solo: A Star Wars Story, the next decade or so will see Han and his new buddy Chewbacca smuggling and getting into trouble with the Empire. However, Star Wars fans know that he’s destined to become a hero, and that’s something that Qi’ra saw in him. She, on the other hand, is intent on climbing through Crimson Dawn’s ranks, as evidenced by her contacting Darth Maul after killing Dryden Vos and placing blame squarely on Tobias Beckett for the coaxium being stolen. In the end, Qi’ra decided to leave Han behind rather than stay with him, but it was for his protection. So Sam Witwer made an interesting point when I interviewed him ahead of Solo‘s home media release. During the first viewing, Qi’ra’s deeper intentions aren’t clear cut, but upon re-watching, you can see how Qi’ra is ultimately steering Han away from the direction she’s heading. It sadly means that they’ll never be together, but if it also results in Qi’ra saving Han’s soul, then it was the right call.

While Solo: A Star Wars Story made it clear that Qi’ra had been hanging out with a bad crowd over the last several years, her descent into darkness into darkness was cemented when Darth Maul appeared as a hologram, with Sam Witwer reprising vocal duties on Maul and Ray Park returning to physically portray the tattooed Zabrak nearly 20 years after his debut in The Phantom Menace. Given Solo‘s poor box office run, it seems unlikely that we’ll see Qi’ra’s time with Maul on Dathomir explored in a sequel, but since Lucasfilm churns out new Star Wars novels and comic books regularly, here’s hoping someday we learn what happened to Qi’ra after the movie in a different medium.

Solo: A Star Wars Story arrives on Digital HD this Friday, September 14, and the Blu-ray and DVD copies hit shelves on September 25. As for what other Star Wars movies are on the way, consult our handy guide.

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Watch Kendrick Lamar Pay Tribute To Mac Miller’s Life, Music, And Contagious Smile

While the music world continues to feel the aftershocks from the unexpected passing of Mac Miller — who died on September 7 at age 26 — memorials and tributes for the late rapper have been flowing in. The latest comes from Kendrick Lamar, who thoughtfully remembered his friend and collaborator in a video recorded for Complex’s Open Late With Peter Rosenberg on Wednesday night (September 12).

After calling Miller a “funny, funny, funny individual” and talking about how he had “the same type of sick, twisted sense of humor” as him, Lamar continued, “Great musician, great writer. Just always had a smile on his face, and that’s something that I commend. No matter what he was going through, he didn’t make you feel sorry for him. He was strong about it.”

Lamar, who collaborated with Miller on 2016’s “God Is Fair, Sexy Nasty,” further commended the Pittsburgh MC’s unbridled positive energy.

“He always kept a smile on his face because he wanted you to smile too, and that’s just something I always loved,” he said. “No matter whatever personal issues, he gave you that energy. It wasn’t no ‘misery loves company’ with him. He showed a smile and you gave that smile right back. It made you feel good. So forever we gonna remember the life and we gonna remember that smile. Celebrate. Mac Miller. Love!”

Lamar’s video comes just a day after thousands of Miller’s family, friends, and fans gathered at Pittsburgh’s Blue Slide Park to honor his life with a hometown vigil.

The Open Late episode also featured Miller tributes from Macklemore, Machine Gun Kelly, Ty Dolla $ign, and more. See the full episode here.

EA Reportedly Being Investigated Over Loot Boxes In Europe

Loot boxes have become a hot button topic in more than just gaming. After Electronic Arts tried to have DICE implement the premium loot box system into Star Wars: Battlefront II, a lot of gamers, Star Wars fans, and parents rebelled, even going so far as to directly contact Disney and local lawmakers about the issue. After regional gambling commissions caught wind of it, some of them began enforcing gambling laws that require companies to register a gambling license in order to provide gambling services to the public. Companies like EA did not want to register for a gambling license but still wanted to include loot boxes into games like FIFA, which caused the company to run afoul of lawmakers, and now the publisher is being investigated by the authorities in certain European countries.

The news originated from the Dutch media outlet Metro, but Eurogamer provided an English translation of events, which reveals that the Belgian government has reportedly launched a criminal investigation into Electronic Arts after the company refused to remove the premium loot boxes from games like _FIFA. _

Originally, the Belgian gaming commission labeled games containing premium loot boxes as “illegal,” due to them relying on spending real money to earn a chance at being awarded with a prize. The fact that the prize is random and not directly what consumers may have wanted to purchase, it means that you’re basically playing a slot machine or roulette in hopes of gaining the item you want. Belgium and the Netherlands specifically listed games such as Overwatch and Dota 2 as the offenders of this unlawful practice, along with NBA 2K and the FIFA series.

2K Games recently and reluctantly removed the loot boxes from NBA 2K, while Blizzard and Valve also adhered to the policy of prohibiting those from Belgium and the Netherlands from accessing the loot boxes in their games. Electronic Arts, however, refused to remove the loot boxes in FIFA, claiming that loot boxes are ethically and lawfully implemented into its games. This refusal to comply with the governing laws has caught the watchful eye of the authorities, and now Electronic Arts will have to answer to the legal system.

Actual casinos and online gambling organizations have to get licenses to operate, otherwise they run the risk of the gambling commission shutting them down. This occurred back in 2016 with the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive scandal, where multiple YouTubers were engaged in running skin betting rings where gamers would gamble on loot boxes for the opportunity to unbox a rare skin. The gambling commission actually held Valve responsible for the gambling rings and ordered them to shut down the rings or face the legal consequences. This resulted in Valve issuing cease and desist letters to the Counter-Strike betting rings.

It’s unclear what Electronic Arts’ motivation will be facing off against the authorities over this move, as loot boxes are widely disliked by the gaming community, and, unless the company has plans on obtaining a gambling license, it’s difficult to see how EA would come out the victor in this case. However, we’ll soon find out if Belgium will fine EA or attempt to enact some other punitive measure against the company.