Meghan Markle Reportedly Sent Thank-You Notes to All Who Wished Her a Happy Birthday

Meghan Markle may still be brushing up on the finer points of royal protocol, but it seems she’s got thank-you note etiquette down pat. On Tuesday, royal commentator Omid Scobie shared a photo on Twitter of the cards that the Duchess of Sussex reportedly sent to all who wished her a happy birthday last month.

Though Scobie didn’t share an inside look at the card, the outside features a color photograph of Meghan flashing a huge grin while greeting an excited group of well-wishers during a royal engagement with Prince Harry, who can be seen standing next to her in the photo. The cards were reportedly signed, sealed, and sent just over a month after Meghan’s 37th birthday, on August 4, placing her on the prompt end of the recommended one- to three-month time frame for sending thank-you notes after a birthday or wedding.

Take a look:

But Meghan’s big day wasn’t actually all about her. On August 4, she and Harry attended the wedding of his longtime friend Charlie van Straubenzee and Daisy Jenks. The ceremony took place in a chapel in the village of Churt in Surrey, just southwest of London. For the sunny summer wedding, Meghan wore a navy Club Monaco dress and a matching fascinator, while her husband coordinated by pairing a royal blue vest and light blue tie with his traditional morning coat and gray striped trousers.

Though Meghan was undoubtedly showered with gifts once she and Harry returned to the palace, she reportedly wasn’t allowed to keep many of them. Per royal guidelines, members of the royal family aren’t allowed to accept from the public any gifts that come with strings attached or monetary offerings that aren’t directed toward a charity. They can, however, keep benign items like flowers, food, and books, or anything else that costs less than £150 ($195). So, if you sent your fave royal a B-day gift that abides by those guidelines, there’s a good chance you’ll be getting a thank-you note in return.

Related: Meghan Markle’s Mom Flew to London for a Quick Visit, and No One Knew About It

The Grey’s Anatomy Season 15 Trailer Will Make Your Heart Stop

The 15th season of Grey’s Anatomy is finally upon us—and judging by the new trailer, the long-running AB drama still has some tricks up its sleeve.

First, we’re introduced to the new docs on the block, including Nashville‘s Chris Carmack, who likes to be called “Ortho God.” We also meet Alex Landi, who will play the show’s first openly gay male surgeon, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Once the trailer gets the rookie introductions out of the way, it launches into some of the major twists this season has in store for audiences. We see Teddy (Kim Raver) revealing her pregnancy to Maggie (Kelly McCreary). At one point, gunshots can be heard being fired in the Grey-Sloan Memorial OR. But the shot that will likely give fans the biggest shock features Meredith (Ellen Pompeo) hooking up with none other than Dr. Andrew DeLuca (Giacomo Gianniotti). While the jarring image might end up being a dream sequence, it still leaves us wondering what’s in store for Meredith’s love life this season.

Thankfully, showrunner Krista Vernoff recently sat down with TVLine and shed some light on what she’s dubbing the “Season of Love.””Yes, [Mer]’s a single mom, and that complicates a dating life,” Vernoff said. “And yes, she’s a surgical marvel with new, game-changing medical ideas she’ll be pursuing. But she also hasn’t dated at all since [Martin Henderson’s] Nathan Riggs left [in Season 14]. And the one-two punch of meeting [Scott Speedman’s] Nick Marsh awoke a desire in her that she can’t put back to sleep.”

So, that’s something. Vernoff added, “The question this season is not ‘Will Meredith Grey find love again?’ but ‘With whom will she find love?'” We’ll find out, when Season 15 of Grey’s Anatomy premieres on Thursday, September 27, at 8 p.m.

Watch the trailer below.

Related: So This Is What Determines How Characters Get Killed Off on Grey’s Anatomy

Lakeith Stanfield Is a New Kind of Leading Man

If there’s one moment that sums up Lakeith Stanfield’s abilities, I’d argue it’s this: Halfway through season two of Atlanta, his character, Darius, attends a party at Drake’s mansion (just go with it) and has a stoned conversation with a woman about the nature of illusion. Sitting in the middle of a pool, tossing an apple in the air, he cites Swedish philosopher Bostrom’s simulation argument, which suggests reality is computer generated. It’s weird—like, super weird—but something about the way he delivers the complicated dialogue has you nodding along with every word.

Stanfield, 27, first signed on to the FX series because he thought it might provide “some deeper insight into the Atlanta music scene.” But the surreal comedy, which stars Donald Glover as Earn Marks, the manager and cousin of a rapper named Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry), and Stanfield as their offbeat friend, has become a genre-defying treatise on all aspects of black life. “I began to realize it was a story about human beings, and coming to understand one’s self and place in the world,” Stanfield says. “Essentially what the show is saying is that being black is being human. I’m a human first—in black circumstances.”

The day we talk, his circumstances have led him to Good Morning America, where a stylist (“some dude named Adam”) helped him pull together his outfit (“a nineties-style button-up, corduroy pants, Christmas socks, and Saint Laurent shoes”). The experience has led him to ponder those absurd moments of fame. “When it becomes about me, it feels a bit strange,” he says. “It feels like the focus is wrong. And sometimes it makes me feel like I want to get out of there.”

In a world everyone is trying to break into, Stanfield may seem like an outlier, but “that’s something Holly­wood’s trying to put on me,” he says. “I’ve never felt weird.” Still, he admits he’s a bit of a loner, even more so now than when he was a kid who wrote poetry and had a tree for a friend while growing up in Riverside, California. “I was always a people watcher and thought people were really peculiar,” he says. “I’d start fights because I thought it was strange that people could be bothered by so many things.”

His plan was to be an actor, but not on television. “TV to me seemed more fake. I guess ’cause of all the commercials,” Stanfield says. “I liked movies because they were like short stories.” He managed to hustle his way into film auditions by sending out résumés padded with fake productions—“I figured once they let me on set, they would figure out that I’m good enough”—and first captivated audiences as a troubled teen in 2013’s Short Term 12 and then as a terrorized body-snatch victim in last year’s Oscar-winning Get Out.

PHOTO: Jeff Vespa/Vespa Pictures

Television became more appealing once he met Glover at a Hollywood party, where the Atlanta creator pitched him the series on the spot. “When he saw me, he was like, ‘Hey, what’s up? I got this role you might be good for,’ and handed over the script. I think he was out looking for his Darius. I was just like, Here’s an opportunity. And it turned out to be cool.”

Cool is an understatement. Stanfield now finds himself at the center of an overdue small-screen black renaissance that includes everything from Black-ish to Insecure and The Chi while also building a career as a movie star. In July he earned raves as a struggling telemarketer in Sorry to Bother You; next month he’ll play an NSA expert in the thriller The Girl in the Spider’s Web.

This career versatility is more gut instinct than game plan. “I’m attracted to stories that move me,” he says. “Sometimes those are surreal, but more often they’re just stories that deal with characters who have to overcome challenges and get through and adapt.” I ask whether he’s worried that the trappings of fame might somehow change who he is or how he sees the world. “No,” he says quickly.

“You’re solid?” I offer.

“Solid as a rock.”

Atlanta returns to FX next year. Clover Hope is a writer in Brooklyn and an editor at Jezebel.

How Actress Sonoya Mizuno is Changing the Perception of Multiethnic Beauty

As a former ballerina, Sonoya Mizuno has some serious makeup skills. “I used to wear loads of it for performances, so I can contour and apply fake eyelashes like a pro,” she says. Even after stepping away from the stage a few years ago and reinventing herself as a full-blown chameleon on the big screen, playing everything from a disco-dancing robot in Ex Machina to a Crazy Rich Asian, the always-adventurous, Japanese English Argentinian stunner continues to push the beauty boundaries—on and off the red carpet. “It’s fun to channel a different mood and character through makeup,” she tells Glamour recently in New York City.

With that philosophy, it’s no surprise that global beauty brand Shiseido would tap her as the new front woman for their latest makeup collection. Still, in a world where the industry’s top players have historically and habitually featured the idealized standards of Asian beauty (long straight hair, pearly skin, monolid eyes), casting the 30-year-old mixed-race actress in a major campaign marks a huge step forward for inclusivity and representation among Asian women.

We sat down with Mizuno as she got ready for the launch of her new campaign. Here she opens up about being multiethnic, taking a hair risk, and the one J-beauty innovation she says keeps her face “right.”

Glamour: What’s the one beauty rule you swear by?

Sonoya Mizuno: It’s really boring, but it works. I drink a glass of water and half a lemon as soon as I wake up. I heard that it’s supposed to balance your body’s pH. Not sure if that’s true, but to be honest, it really helps with bloating.

Glamour: What are your nonnegotiable skin care products?

SM: I’ve got combination skin, so it’s difficult to find things that are the right consistency. But Shiseido’s Essential Energy is the perfect lightweight serum-moisturizer hybrid that gives me a nice dewy glow. I love everything about it—the texture, the smell, and the pot is really pretty, which is always a plus. I also use its SPF 50 every day. I find most sunscreens are heavy, but this one doesn’t clog me up at all.

Glamour: What’s the one J-beauty innovation we all need in our lives?

SM: I bought a face roller in Japan years ago—it makes giving yourself a proper facial massage kind of fun. If I’m good about doing it, it helps keep my face lifted, tight, and right.

Glamour: What’s the biggest beauty mistake you’ve ever made?

SM: I was a child of the nineties and used to pluck my eyebrows nonstop. Mine were so thin, but in my defense, that was the look back then. They’ve grown back for the most part, but there are still bits that I don’t think will ever fill in. It’s fine, though, because there are plenty of tools, products, and pros that can work some brow magic.

Glamour: What’s the best makeup trick you’ve picked up on set?

SM: Primer is a miracle worker. My skin can get quite shiny and oily, so if I use a touch of primer underneath foundation, it makes the biggest difference.

Glamour: Your new pixie cut is killer. What’s your holy grail hair product for keeping it in check?

SM: I cut it for a job, and I have admit: Having short hair is much harder than I thought, especially when it’s super thick like mine. When I wake up in the morning, it’s literally sticking up everywhere. But I have a secret method: I’ll throw in a little Aveda Confixor when my hair’s still damp, then blow-dry with a do-rag on. I let my hair cool before I take it off and it behaves all day.

Glamour: Seems like you’re always down for a hair transformation. What’s the next big thing you want to try?

SM: Many, many years ago my mom used to have short blond hair, and I always remember thinking how amazing she looked. I’ve got the cut, so now I just need the platinum color!

Glamour: You’re multiethnic—part Japanese, British, and Argentinian. How has that translated into your attitude toward beauty? Did you ever feel like you didn’t fit the “ideal” standards?

SM: For most of my childhood, I grew up in the countryside of England where it was very suburban—there weren’t a lot of people who were multicultural like my family. It was a place where the blond and brunette girls in school were considered gorgeous. And because of that, I remember feeling like I wasn’t good enough. But as I got older and experienced the world outside of my hometown, I started seeing more people like me. Now I don’t compare myself to anyone. I look the way I do, and I totally embrace that.

Glamour: What’s the one thing you wish you could steal from your Crazy Rich Asians character Araminta?

SM: So many! I’d take her energy and confidence for sure. Let’s throw in her money and insane wedding too, while we’re at it.

Glamour: What’s your go-to getting-ready music?

SM: It depends on what kind of phase I’m going through, but at the moment, I’m all about Awkafina’s new album [In Fina We Trust]. She’s so good and it’s so funny. I literally laugh out loud when I listen to it.

Glamour: What’s your favorite emoji?

SM: My signature response is the implacable face with the straight lines for the eyes and mouth: 😑. It’s the perfect way to say, “That was funny, but I’m not going to laugh,” or “What you said was nice, but I’m not going to say thank you.” It’s appropriate for like 99 percent of text messages.

Glamour: What’s your best self-care tip?

SM: Sleep. I drench my sheets in lavender essential oil before I lie down and that helps a lot. Still working on getting more of it though. I swear by yoga too.

Glamour: What smell always makes you smile?

SM: The scent of a Sunday roast, which my family would have every week growing up. It reminds me of them and all the good laughs we would share together.

Glamour: Who’s the person who inspires you most?

SM: I’m one of six and would be lost without my siblings. We’re really close. They always understand what I’m going through.

Glamour: What’s the one piece of beauty advice you’d give to your 13-year-old self?

SM: Be kind to yourself. I think back to all those ballet classes that would end in tears, and now I’m like, What was that for? I was harder on myself than I needed to be, but I guess in some ways it was good training for Hollywood—and life.

How Actress Sonoya Mizuno is Changing the Perception of Multi-Ethnic Beauty

As a former ballerina, Sonoya Mizuno has some serious makeup skills. “I used to wear loads of it for performances, so I can contour and apply fake eyelashes like a pro,” she says. Even after stepping away from the stage a few years ago and reinventing herself as a full-blown chameleon on the big screen, playing everything from a disco-dancing robot in Ex Machina to a Crazy Rich Asian, the always-adventurous, Japanese-English-Argentinian stunner continues to push the beauty boundaries—on and off the red carpet. “It’s fun to channel a different mood and character through makeup,” she tells Glamour recently in NYC.

With that philosophy, it’s no surprise that global beauty brand Shiseido would tap her as the new front woman for their latest makeup collection. Still, in a world where the industry’s top players have historically and habitually featured the idealized standards of Asian beauty (long straight hair, pearly skin, monolid eyes), casting the 30-year-old mixed-race actress in a major campaign marks a huge step forward for inclusivity and representation among Asian women.

We sat down with Mizuno as she got ready for the launch of her new campaign. Here, she opens up about being multi-ethnic, taking a hair risk, and the one J-beauty innovation she says keeps her face “right.”

Glamour: What’s the one beauty rule you swear by?

Sonoya Mizuno: It’s really boring, but it works. I drink a glass of water and half a lemon as soon as I wake up. I heard that it’s supposed to balance your body’s pH. Not sure if that’s true, but to be honest, it really helps with bloating.

Glamour: What are your non-negotiable skin care products?

SM: I’ve got combination skin, so it’s difficult to find things that are the right consistency. But Shiseido’s Essential Energy is the perfect lightweight serum-moisturizer hybrid that gives me a nice dewy glow. I love everything about it—the texture, the smell, and the pot is really pretty, which is always a plus. I also use its SPF 50 every day. I find most sunscreens are heavy, but this one doesn’t clog me up at all.

Glamour: What’s the one J-beauty innovation we all need in our lives?

SM: I bought a face roller in Japan years ago—it makes giving yourself a proper facial massage kind of fun. If I’m good about doing it, it helps keep my face lifted, tight, and right.

Glamour: What’s the biggest beauty mistake you’ve ever made?

SM: I was a child of the nineties and used to pluck my eyebrows non-stop. Mine were so thin, but in my defense, that was the look back then. They’ve grown back for the most part, but there are still bits that I don’t think will ever fill in. It’s fine, though, because there are plenty of tools, products, and pros that can work some brow magic.

Glamour: What’s the best makeup trick you’ve picked up on set?

SM: Primer is a miracle worker. My skin can get quite shiny and oily, so if I use a touch of primer underneath foundation, it makes the biggest difference.

Glamour: Your new pixie cut is killer. What’s your holy grail hair product for keeping it in check?

SM: I cut it for a job, and I have admit: Having short hair is much harder than I thought, especially when it’s super thick like mine. When I wake up in the morning, it’s literally sticking up everywhere. But I have a secret method: I’ll throw in a little Aveda Confixor when my hair’s still damp, then blow-dry with a durag on. I let my hair cool before I take it off and it behaves all day.

Glamour: Seems like you’re always down for a hair transformation. What’s the next big thing you want to try?

SM: Many, many years ago my mom used to have short blond hair and I always remember thinking how amazing she looked. I’ve got the cut, so now I just need the platinum color!

Glamour: You’re multi-ethnic—part Japanese, British, and Argentinian. How has that translated into your attitude towards beauty? Did you ever feel like you didn’t fit the “ideal” standards?

SM: For most of my childhood, I grew up in the countryside of England where it was very suburban—there weren’t a lot of people who were multicultural like my family. It was a place where the blond and brunette girls in school were considered gorgeous. And because of that, I remember feeling like I wasn’t good enough. But as I got older and experienced the world outside of my hometown, I started seeing more people like me. Now, I don’t compare myself to anyone. I look the way I do, and I totally embrace that.

Glamour: What’s the one thing you wish you could steal from your Crazy Rich Asians character Araminta?

SM: So many! I’d take her energy and confidence for sure. Let’s throw in her money and insane wedding, too, while we’re at it.

Glamour: What’s your go-to getting-ready music?

SM: It depends on what kind of phase I’m going through, but at the moment, I’m all about Awkafina’s new album [In Fina We Trust]. She’s so good and it’s so funny. I literally laugh out loud when I listen to it.

Glamour: What’s your favorite emoji?

SM: My signature response is the implacable face with the straight lines for the eyes and mouth: 😑. It’s the perfect way to say, “That was funny, but I’m not going to laugh” or “What you said was nice, but I’m not going to say thank you.” It’s appropriate for like 99 percent of text messages.

Glamour: What’s your best self-care tip?

SM: Sleep. I drench my sheets in lavender essential oil before I lay down and that helps a lot. Still working on getting more of it though. I swear by yoga, too.

Glamour: What smell always makes you smile?

SM: The scent of a Sunday roast, which my family would have every week growing up. It reminds me of them and all the good laughs we would share together.

Glamour: Who’s the person who inspires you most?

SM: I’m one of six and would be lost without my siblings. We’re really close. They always understand what I’m going through.

Glamour: What’s the one piece of beauty advice you’d give to your 13-year-old self?

SM: Be kind to yourself. I think back to all those ballet classes that would end in tears, and now, I’m like what was that for? I was harder on myself than I needed to be, but I guess in some ways it was good training for Hollywood—and life.

Bachelor in Paradise Season 5, Episode 10 Recap: These Breakups Are Hard to Watch

Caution: Spoilers ahead.

It’s a new day on Bachelor in Paradise, but that doesn’t mean the spell Shushanna cast is over. “So, are you a good witch or a bad witch?” Wells asks Shu first thing in the morning. “I’m a good witch,” she replies. All kidding aside, Shu thinks she just has “the look” of a witch, so that’s how the rumor spread. Even if that’s true, Shu, I don’t think burning Kamil’s photo in the fire helped.

In other news, Jordan and Jenna go on a date where they take “engagement photos.” Their purple-haired photographer seems nice enough, but I suspect he has some sort of vendetta against the double Js because the “final” photos we see on screen are so, so awkward. Jenna’s eyes are half-closed in one, Jordan makes a weird face in another…they’re all outtakes, basically. What did they do to piss him off? It must be bad because before shoot ends, he springs a surprise on Jenna: a wedding dress to wear in the last pics. Jenna isn’t into this—not because of the dress or the lame premise. No, she’s uncomfortable because her feelings for Jordan are real, and she wants to know if he feels the same way. When she confesses this to Jordan, he says all the right things and then they jump into the ocean. After all that, did the photographer even take any wedding dress pics? Unclear.

Anyway, they return to the villa from their date and a new arrival shows up soon after: Robby, who is met with crickets. The guys don’t want a new person competing for a rose, and the women don’t want a sentient Kewpie doll in their presence. Also, as Cassandra says, “Why is Robby Hayes here? Every single girl here knows his reputation; it’s not a good one.”

Everyone gossips about how he cheated on Amanda Stanton after last season of Bachelor in Paradise, but when Robby asks Shushanna out she says yes.

“I feel like Shushanna’s moved on from Kamil. She burned his photo in the fire.” – I forgot to write down who said this, but it’s gold nonetheless.

Shushanna knows people have “negative thoughts” about Robby—or, as Astrid puts it, “You can’t turn a fuckboy into a husband”—but she doesn’t “want to hear about it.” On their date, Shu tells Robby that everyone thinks she’s a witch. He brushes it off and jokes, “Put a spell on me hahaha,” and this is enough to win her over.

Back at the villa, Joe tries to have a serious conversation with Kendall about whether or not they’re on track to getting engaged. She avoids the conversation and ducks out before giving him a real answer. And the next day, she totally avoids him.

That night, ahead of the rose ceremony, there are three main dramas at play. First, there’s the love triangle between Olivia, Diggy, and John. Diggy pulled some strings (read: producers) to get the trumpeter from their first date to come perform for them. However, John steals her away in the middle of it to show her a sunflower field he (producers) made.

Cue an incredibly sad but hilarious montage of Diggy sitting alone with the trumpet player. And it turns out it was even worse than it looks:

The second drama of the night is the most short-lived: Olivia and Cassandra feel it’s their duty as Shu’s friends to warn her about Robby. They tell her he’s a serial cheater and his intentions here questionable, but Shu’s like, “I’m just not sure!” When she asks Robby directly if he’s ever cheated he just says, “Yes.” Somehow, Shu doesn’t seem bothered by this.

“I have been 100 percent honest…since I’ve been here.” -Robby

The main drama of the night is between Kendall and Joe. He’s upset that she’s avoiding a serious talk, but when they finally sit down Kendall admits she doesn’t know if she’s in love with him. Joe’s frustrated; he’s been falling for her this whole time, but it’s hard to express that when she’s said repeatedly she’s afraid of commitment because her past boyfriends “suffocated” her. Kendall thought they were on the same page, but Joe says that was her projecting. They break up and leave paradise in tears.

Their departure throws everyone off, but the rose ceremony must go on. The couples are: Cassandra and Jordan, Shushanna and Robby, Annaliese and Kamil, Astrid and Kevin, Krystal and Chris, Jenna and Jordan, and Olivia and John. This means Diggy is leaving paradise, but there’s always his trumpet player! Literally, the trumpet player is sitting in the back of the van with Diggy.

The next morning, Kevin spends an hour talking about the eight-egg omelet he ordered. You know Astrid loves him because she listens to the whole thing and says “Wow!” without any hint of sarcasm. But before he gets a chance to eat it, Chris Harrison shows up to reveal that nobody new will be entering paradise. Instead, the remaining couples have a few options: leave hand in hand, stay and go to the fantasy suite (and probably head toward an engagement), or say goodbye now.

With that, things start getting real. John tells Olivia that he likes her, but he doesn’t think they’re ready for the fantasy suite and all that comes with it yet. She agrees, and they decide to leave but continue “hanging out.” Cassandra and Jordan split, and it’s as awkward as their entire relationship. Robby breaks up with Shushanna by saying, “If I’m in Utah, we can grab dinner or something.”

Annaliese right away is like, “We should DEFINITELY do the fantasy suite!” Kamil, who seconds earlier was on the verge of breaking up with her, backtracks and says he’s in. Chris and Krystal, and Jenna and Jordan, also decide they’re ready for their individual fantasy suites.

The big surprise comes when Kevin and Astrid talk. He’s freaking out because the last two times he’s done the fantasy suite have been a disaster. (Kevin, why are you still signing up for this franchise? You know you can say no, right?) “There’s something missing with me,” he says through tears. “It’s like I’m at 80%.” It’s clear this is all about him and nothing to do with her—but it’s still hard on Astrid. She feels blindsided because, to her, she gave him so many opportunities to be open about how he was feeling. It’s a hard breakup to watch—probably because it’s one of the most realistic ones to happen on this show. Ultimately, they both leave alone.

As for the fantasy suites, they’re pretty uneventful unless you’ve been dying to watch Krystal rub a feather over Chris’ bare chest. (And if so, may I suggest therapy?) So with that, I’ll see you tomorrow for the season finale. Almost there!

Lady Gaga Wore Less Than $50 Worth of Makeup on Her ‘Vogue’ Cover

Lady Gaga, our lady of prosthetic cheekbones and heels while hiking, has solidified a new phase of her style evolution. The actress and singer’s Vogue cover went live today, featuring a stripped-down, fresh, and dewy side of Gaga. The past few months have seen her step largely away from the theatrical roots that she came up with, so the look’s not necessarily new—since Joanne debuted, Gaga has increasingly let her raw self into the spotlight. Still, the Vogue cover is the most she’s committed to her bare-bones vibe yet. And as her fans can attest, no one goes for it like Gaga.

Even better? Where tons of Gaga’s looks clock in at triple dollar-sign level prices, this one came at a refreshingly low cost. As in, under $50 in all: According to Vogue, Gaga’s longtime makeup artist, Sarah Tanno, created Gaga’s light-touch look using L’Oréal Paris True Match Super-Blendable Makeup and Infallible Longwear Blush Shaping Stick in Sexy-Flush. The slightly glossy, balmy texture on her eyes came from L’Oréal Paris Infallible Paints Metallics Eye Shadow in 400 Rose Chrome, while the look’s centerpiece, her strong, dark brows, came from the brand’s Brow Stylist Definer in Brunette. Colour Riche Shine Lipstick in Shining Peach finished her lips with a gentle sheen.

As our entertainment writer Chris Rosa put it: a bargain beauty shopper is born!

If you’re wondering where this all came from, Gaga tells Vogue that she’s welcomed a “galaxy of change” over the past decade, so fronting Vogue‘s October issue with barely any makeup makes sense (even as we’re still trying to wrap our heads around it). Gaga and Tanno usually use Marc Jacobs cosmetics—Tanno is a Global Artistry Ambassador for the brand—so this is an unusually accessible change of pace for the duo. But rumors have also flown about Gaga launching a brand of her own (named HAUS Beauty, because of course), and this would’ve been a prime time to whip it out. So maybe all bets are off for Vogue, or this is a new era of Gaga that’s here to stay.

Speaking to shedding some of her larger-than-life looks, Gaga says, “For me, fashion and art and music have always been a form of armor. I just kept creating more and more fantasies to escape into, new skins to shed. And every time I shed a skin, it was like taking a shower when you’re dirty: getting rid of, washing off, shedding all of the bad, and becoming something new.”

She added: “I just remember feeling so irritated at the thought that I had to conform to being ‘normal,’ or less of whatever I was already born as. And so I took such radical enjoyment in expressing who I am in the most grandiose of ways. It was sort of like a very polite ‘Fuck off.’ It was never about looking perfect—it was always about just being myself. And I think that’s what it’s always been about for my fans, too. It was a form of protection, and a secret—like a wink from afar. I’m a monster, and you’re a monster too.”

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Olivia Munn Fought to Have a Sex Offender Removed From Her Movie

Last Thursday, just a week before the scheduled theatrical release of The Predator, starring Olivia Munn, Trevante Rhodes, and Keegan-Michael Key, The Los Angeles Times published a report describing how a full scene had been cut from the film late in post-production after word spread that an actor featured in it is a registered sex offender. Munn reportedly led the charge to have Steven Wilder Striegel, the actor in question, removed from the film. Per the Times, after Munn learned in mid-August that Striegel pleaded guilty to and served jail time for attempting to lure a minor into a sexual relationship through the Internet in 2010 (and has since been listed on the sex offender registry), she relayed the information to 20th Century Fox, which soon made the decision to cut Striegel’s scene.

Since news broke of Striegel’s exclusion from the movie, Munn has continued to be outspoken about the cast and crew’s handling of the situation. In an interview with Vanity Fair on Saturday (September 8), she described feeling alone among her coworkers, none of whom, she said, had reached out to her in the wake of the controversy. (VF later updated the story to say that at least one costar had reached out to her; Key claimed in a statement to VF that he had “reached out to Olivia privately”; fellow cast member Sterling K. Brown penned several tweets over the weekend apologizing to Munn and praising her for “taking action.”)

“I kind of feel like I’m the one going to jail,” Munn told VF. “I didn’t go to jail, I didn’t put this guy on our set. I had this scene deleted. Thank God, honestly, that there is social media. It’s the fans and news outlets that’s confirming it to me that what I did was the right thing. If I didn’t have that feedback, I’d kind of go a little crazy thinking, ‘Why am I being treated like this?’ That’s not O.K., to feel like the bad guy.” Munn continued, “Getting a convicted sex offender out of a movie that has global reach is extremely important, but the reality of what I’ve had to go through in this process of just finding out, it’s a crazy thing. It’s like I stumbled upon something and now I’m being chased by everyone and isolated.”

She noted that she was especially disappointed when some of her cast mates gave director Shane Black (who admitted, in a statement to the Times, to knowing about his friend Striegel’s conviction before casting him in The Predator) a standing ovation at the film’s Toronto Film Festival premiere last Thursday. “I looked back and I see the guys standing up, and I was just confused, because I hadn’t heard from them during the day. Everybody else was sitting down — it wasn’t like this massive standing ovation for him. I felt it was still appropriate to clap and cheer, but to actually make that gesture to stand up, especially in this moment…and privately I knew that no one reached out to me to say, ‘Are you O.K.?’ It did feel bad,” said Munn, who also told The Hollywood Reporter on Saturday that she had yet to receive a personal apology from Black for casting Striegel. (Black did release a public apology after the LA Times story was published, saying, “I apologize to all of those, past and present, I’ve let down by having Steve around them without giving them a voice in the decision.”)

At the film’s Toronto premiere, Munn told Variety that she didn’t hear from Fox between her alerting them to Striegel’s past and their cutting the scene. “When I called, [Fox] was silent for two days,” she said. “I’m not saying they weren’t working on it behind the scenes. I just didn’t hear anything about it. But I’m happy that they did, obviously, because I’m proud of the work we did in this movie. We all worked really, really hard, and I wouldn’t be able to morally stand behind this movie with this guy in there.”

“Our studio was not aware of Mr. Striegel’s background when he was hired,” Fox said in a statement to the Times. “We were not aware of his background during the casting process due to legal limitations that impede studios from running background checks on actors.”

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Naomi Osaka Explains Why She Apologized While Accepting Her U.S. Open Trophy

On Saturday (September 8), after an incredible whirlwind journey through the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Naomi Osaka took home her first Grand Slam championship trophy by defeating her idol, Serena Williams, in two sets. The 20-year-old’s victory was somewhat tainted, however, by the controversy that arose between Williams and the presiding umpire during the match, which resulted in Williams automatically losing first one point and then an entire game in the second set (punishments that Williams promptly labeled sexist. While receiving her trophy after the match, Osaka was visibly upset and, during her acceptance speech, apologized to the crowd. In an interview with the Today show on Monday morning (September 10), the athlete discussed the controversial match and her ensuing reactions.

Osaka said that, as Williams’ penalties rolled in, she wasn’t entirely sure what was happening. “I didn’t really know what was going on because I went to the back and I had my back turned. And then, before I knew it, she was saying there was a game penalty, so I was a little bit confused throughout the whole thing,” she said. The confusion continued as the match ended and the crowd began booing, presumably at umpire Carlos Ramos. “I felt a little bit sad because I wasn’t really sure if they were booing at me or if it wasn’t the outcome that they wanted,” Osaka said, explaining why she’d pulled her visor over her face to hide her tears as the crowd jeered. “And then I also could sympathize because I’ve been a fan of Serena my whole life and I knew how badly the crowd wanted her to win.” She added, “It was just really emotional.”

Seeing Osaka’s tears during the awards ceremony,Williams put her arm around her opponent and used her turn at the microphone to ask the crowd to celebrate Osaka’s win, rather than decrying her loss, which Osaka said on Monday “made me happy overall.” When it was her time to address the audience, according to The New York Times, Osaka said, “I know that everyone was cheering for her. I’m sorry it had to end like this. I just want to say thank you for watching the match.” When asked on the Today show why she apologized, Osaka explained, “I don’t know, I just felt like everyone was sort of unhappy up there and I know that the ending wasn’t really how people wanted it to be. I know that, in my dreams, I won, like, in a very tough, competitive match. So, I don’t know, I just felt very emotional and I felt like I had to apologize.”

Osaka also noted that, in the wake of her big win, she hasn’t had time to review what happened during the match and come to her own conclusion about what went down between Williams and the umpire, but that she plans to do so as soon as possible. “This is sort of one of the biggest things that happened to me,” she said. And she’s also having some trouble processing that other pretty big thing that happened on Saturday — you know, becoming the first-ever Japanese tennis player to win a Grand Slam title. “It still feels a little bit surreal, but I think it’s slowly sinking in,” she told Today.

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John Legend became the youngest (and first black male) to achieve EGOT status last night after he took home an Emmy for his work in Jesus Christ Superstar Live. An EGOT, if you don’t know, is someone in entertainment who’s won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award. Not many people have achieved this feat—Meryl Streep can’t even call herself an EGOT—so Legend’s recent win is a huge deal. He joins a club of 14 other actors, writers, producers, composers, and singers who’ve all won the four coveted awards. From screen legends like Audrey Hepburn to living icon Whoopi Goldberg, here are all the performers who are EGOTs.